Thursday, April 30, 2009

Fitness Models Tone it Sexy

Fitness-model trainer Ocean Bloom whips clients into taut form that inspires some to take their new bodies into competition.

It’s hard to believe but Helen Aloiai used to struggle to put on weight.

The Glen Eden bodybuilder says she was always a "skinny chick with abs" and constantly moaned at her trainer that she would never be able to get any bigger.

But a change in eating habits and plenty of hard work in the gym put that right and in 2006 she became the amateur champion of the world by winning the Miss Universe event in Sparta, Greece.

And last month the mother of four added another trophy to a cabinet that could soon be bulging at the seams by taking out the Australian All State Grand Prix.

She never expected to have such success after entering her first competition eight years ago.

"I’d been a gym bum for about 15 years and wondered if I’d be competitive on the bodybuilding circuit," she says.

"So I rang one of the judges and asked him to come and have a look at me. All I really knew about it was what I’d seen in the American muscle mags. Those women were just huge."

Aloiai found that the physiques on show in this part of the world were a lot smaller and she was soon on a winning streak.

"I really enjoyed doing well," she says. "Then one time when I didn’t win I talked to my coach and he said: ‘Well, you actually need to change your shape and get bigger’."

That’s where the new diet came in and Aloiai, who tipped the scales at 86kg in Australia, reckons it took some getting used to at first.

"I had to set my phone to ring every hour and a half to remind me to eat. I’d just have something little like a banana or yoghurt. Then I’d reset my phone and do it again. It took about a month before I stopped feeling sick all the time because I was just always eating. But it was good stuff, not just pies and doughnuts."

The mental health worker went from eating the usual three large meals a day to devouring between eight and 10 smaller helpings.

It paid off in the form of a string of impressive results but Aloiai admits that sticking to the regime was not easy.

"It’s almost like another job in itself," she says. "You have to prepare your food all the time and you’re constantly thinking about what meals you have to cook. It’s annoying and costly."

Handling such a demanding diet is not the only downside to being an elite bodybuilder.

Aloiai is often the subject of ridicule and abuse when she ventures beyond her front door and says people struggle to accept the way she looks.

"I’m not a very showy person and when I go out I tend to cover up. A lot of that is because of the bad reactions people have. That’s why I love going to competitions and being among my own. A lot of my friends are in minority groups that tend to get picked on as well so it’s nice to be among your own people and appreciated for what you do."

She does still suffer a few pangs of self-consciousness when it’s time to take the stage.

"I’m such a nervous competitor. You’re up there half-naked in a bikini in front of thousands of people and you know everyone is picking you to bits. That’s what you do at bodybuilding shows, you critique all the physiques. I’m not very comfortable with that and competing goes against the grain for me. If I could just send them a photo and they could send me the trophy that would be a lot better."

Aloiai had no desire to become musclebound when she first began lifting weights in her early 20s but did not take long to turn into a gym junkie.

"I used to look at the pictures of ladies with muscles on the walls and thought, that’s ugly, I don’t want to end up like that. But as my body started to tone up and I began to see results I was like, wow, that’s really cool."

And despite the challenge of maintaining the lifestyle and putting up with snide comments, she has no plans to pack the weights away.

"I’ve got to the point where I can’t go back now," she says. "The muscle would just go soft or I’d put on fat. I’d never stop training anyway because I love gymwork and pushing weights."

Aloiai wants to have a crack at the prestigious Olympia event but would need to turn professional and spend time in the United States to do so.

Another trip to Miss Universe is on the cards at the end of this year and she will spend the months until then trying to get even bigger.

"It’s a good challenge because there’s always another kilo you can put on, it’s never going to beat you," she says.


Gym Junkie off to World Champs

http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/sport/2372903/Gym-junkie-off-to-world-champsphoto

It’s hard to believe but Helen Aloiai used to struggle to put on weight.

The Glen Eden bodybuilder says she was always a "skinny chick with abs" and constantly moaned at her trainer that she would never be able to get any bigger.

But a change in eating habits and plenty of hard work in the gym put that right and in 2006 she became the amateur champion of the world by winning the Miss Universe event in Sparta, Greece.

And last month the mother of four added another trophy to a cabinet that could soon be bulging at the seams by taking out the Australian All State Grand Prix.

She never expected to have such success after entering her first competition eight years ago.

"I’d been a gym bum for about 15 years and wondered if I’d be competitive on the bodybuilding circuit," she says.

"So I rang one of the judges and asked him to come and have a look at me. All I really knew about it was what I’d seen in the American muscle mags. Those women were just huge."

Aloiai found that the physiques on show in this part of the world were a lot smaller and she was soon on a winning streak.

"I really enjoyed doing well," she says. "Then one time when I didn’t win I talked to my coach and he said: ‘Well, you actually need to change your shape and get bigger’."

That’s where the new diet came in and Aloiai, who tipped the scales at 86kg in Australia, reckons it took some getting used to at first.

"I had to set my phone to ring every hour and a half to remind me to eat. I’d just have something little like a banana or yoghurt. Then I’d reset my phone and do it again. It took about a month before I stopped feeling sick all the time because I was just always eating. But it was good stuff, not just pies and doughnuts."

The mental health worker went from eating the usual three large meals a day to devouring between eight and 10 smaller helpings.

It paid off in the form of a string of impressive results but Aloiai admits that sticking to the regime was not easy.

"It’s almost like another job in itself," she says. "You have to prepare your food all the time and you’re constantly thinking about what meals you have to cook. It’s annoying and costly."

Handling such a demanding diet is not the only downside to being an elite bodybuilder.

Aloiai is often the subject of ridicule and abuse when she ventures beyond her front door and says people struggle to accept the way she looks.

"I’m not a very showy person and when I go out I tend to cover up. A lot of that is because of the bad reactions people have. That’s why I love going to competitions and being among my own. A lot of my friends are in minority groups that tend to get picked on as well so it’s nice to be among your own people and appreciated for what you do."

She does still suffer a few pangs of self-consciousness when it’s time to take the stage.

"I’m such a nervous competitor. You’re up there half-naked in a bikini in front of thousands of people and you know everyone is picking you to bits. That’s what you do at bodybuilding shows, you critique all the physiques. I’m not very comfortable with that and competing goes against the grain for me. If I could just send them a photo and they could send me the trophy that would be a lot better."

Aloiai had no desire to become musclebound when she first began lifting weights in her early 20s but did not take long to turn into a gym junkie.

"I used to look at the pictures of ladies with muscles on the walls and thought, that’s ugly, I don’t want to end up like that. But as my body started to tone up and I began to see results I was like, wow, that’s really cool."

And despite the challenge of maintaining the lifestyle and putting up with snide comments, she has no plans to pack the weights away.

"I’ve got to the point where I can’t go back now," she says. "The muscle would just go soft or I’d put on fat. I’d never stop training anyway because I love gymwork and pushing weights."

Aloiai wants to have a crack at the prestigious Olympia event but would need to turn professional and spend time in the United States to do so.

Another trip to Miss Universe is on the cards at the end of this year and she will spend the months until then trying to get even bigger.

"It’s a good challenge because there’s always another kilo you can put on, it’s never going to beat you," she says.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Tough Love: Holly mom, daughter strengthen relationship bodybuilding

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2009/04/tough_love_holly_mom_daughter.html

by Joe Lawlor | The Flint Journal
Saturday April 25, 2009, 9:07 PM

Sandy Barber and daughter Kristin compete Satruday in a bodybuilding competition at the University of Michigan-Flint.

FLINT, Michigan -- This mother and daughter tandem go shopping together, get their nails done together, pump iron together and compete in bodybuilding competitions together.

Yes, that's right, mom Sandy Barber, 48, and daughter Kristin, 26, work out two hours a day together at the gym to prepare to show off their muscles.

"We're crazy," Kristin said, laughing.

Wearing sequined, homemade bikinis, the two displayed their rippled backs, toned arms and legs and perfect abs at a bodybuilding competition on Saturday at the University of Michigan-Flint.

Sandy pumped 10-pound weights while Kristin performed crunches as they waited their turns to go under the hot lights and pose for the judges.

The Holly women competed in the "figure" class of the competition, which is less about building muscle mass and more about being toned and in incredible shape.

They split their time at the gym between cardio and muscle-toning workouts.

Sandy Barber warms up her muscles while daughter, Kristin, talks on the phone before Saturday's competition.

"I think we look feminine," Sandy said. "You hear a lot of men say, 'Women shouldn't have muscles,' but I think we look good."

It all started five years ago, when Sandy started working out with a personal trainer. Three years ago, she persuaded her daughter to join in. Both are hooked.

"He (her trainer) created a monster," Sandy said, laughing.

Or, two monsters.

Sandy said since she started working out five years ago, she's lost 30 pounds and gained a sleek look.

"I stopped using the excuse that I had three kids as a reason why I didn't look good anymore," said Sandy, who also is the mother of two adult men.

Sandy and Kristin are both 5-feet, 10-inches tall (they wear four-inch heels during the competition to tower over most of the women), and have blonde hair.

They both weigh around 140 pounds, with Sandy being slightly heavier.

And they both strut confidently onto the stage and flash wide smiles, although Sandy insists she gets nervous.

They train for three competitions per year, and each show takes about 12 weeks of maniacal training.

They both follow a strict diet, weighing their food down to the ounce. No pop or pizza. Lots of fish, chicken and vegetables.

Kristin eats raw oats, which she swears taste good.

"I do love cheesecake, though," Sandy whispered.

They also created a side business together making the specialized bikinis used for the competitions. Many sell for more than $500 apiece.

Kristin wore a turquoise bikini while Sandy sported a reddish-brown bikini in Saturday's competition.

Sandy and Kristin Barber, a mother daughter bodybuilding duo, take the stage Saturday in specialized competition bikinis they made.

Sandy is a barber while Kristin teaches. Kristin is engaged to be married to a man who's not into weightlifting.

Will marriage change her workout ways? She says no, that she's in it "for a long time."

"She told me she'd rather have a six-pack than carry a diaper bag," said Sandy, who nevertheless can't wait to be a grandmother.

"Ten years," Kristin said, smiling.

Meanwhile, Kristin's brother, Blake, manages the Web site for their bikini business.

Blake, who's a three-sport senior at Holly High School, is not into weightlifting. He said his friends make good-natured fun of him at school, but he's used to it.

"They'll see the Web site and say, 'Dude, that's your mom? What's going on?' I get a lot of crap," Blake Barber said.

Mother and daughter get along well and said they don't have tiffs.

Maybe it's because it's difficult to argue when you're sweating and short-winded. Or maybe they just genuinely have a great time together.

"This is a lot of fun, and I get to hang out with you all the time," Kristin said, smiling, to her mom.


Never too Old to Pump

http://www.patriotledger.com/homepage/x303484108/Carver-woman-55-takes-on-bodybuilding

boydbuild ak 032409-03.jpg

The Patriot Ledger
Posted Apr 28, 2009 @ 05:15 AM
Last update Apr 28, 2009 @ 10:21 AM

CARVER —
It was 1 a.m., about five hours before Elizabeth Rohde had to rise to prepare for her latest bodybuilding competition. She was having trouble sleeping.

The 55-year-old mother of two was mentally fixated on how she would appear to judges, themselves veterans of the bodybuilding world, as they scrutinize every detail of her carefully-honed musculature.boydbuild ak 041809-72.jpg

“I got up at 1, went into my basement and I just pumped for about two hours and then went back to bed,” Rohde said. “I have to make sure I pump; if you don’t pump, then you don’t have that nice fullness. I’m a perfectionist. I want to have everything under control.”

Later that morning, on stage in a high school gym in Carver, Rohde sought to emit poise and elegance as she flexed. Her husband Mark, an engineer, had helped her apply a tanning agent in the back. She wore silver high heels and a glittery black velvet top, a sharp contrast from the workmanlike sports bra and weight lifting gloves she dons in the gym.

The hairdresser by trade has been on a pursuit of physiological perfection ever since a local bodybuilder introduced her to the sport two years ago.

“I want to be like a sculpture,” she said. “I think you can accomplish that ... I cannot give it up. I’m addicted. I love it. I just love the sport.”

It comes with sacrifice. In addition to keeping a meticulous diet, Rohde had to gradually stop most food and water intake in the days leading up to the competition. She drank just eight ounces of water the day of the event to achieve a look that is dazzling to the eye.

“Your muscle just sucks your skin like really tight, that’s the effect when you don’t consume as much water,” she said. “It’s a diet that you don’t want to be on. You have to deplete your water. You can’t do that all the time. It’s only for competition.”

Rohde left the Spirit of America contest with trophies in three categories, placing first in the novice division. She’ll compete again Sunday in the Jay Cutler Classic in Boston. Unlike the Carver event, where firm but not oversized bodies were the norm, there will not be steroid testing at the Boston event. Rohde expects some “very large” competition.

The New York City native isn’t intimidated. She’s been defying the odds since she was young, when there was violence in her household and her parents divorced.

She dropped out of school in ninth grade, only capable of reading at a third-grade level.

Despite the tough upbringing, Rohde, who currently lives in Carver, always found time for exercise and athletics. She lifted weights through her first seven months of pregnancy.

Rohde and her husband have raised two highly-educated daughters: One attends Harvard and the other Oxford University. Rohde herself was encouraged to go back to school, and earned an associate’s degree in business from Massasoit Community College in Brockton.

At 55, she’s not sure how much longer she can keep up the regimen. She doesn’t even think about it.

“Only God can stop me,” Rohde said. “One day we’re going to go. But while you’re here, why not look good?”


Friday, April 17, 2009

Nelson Wins Gold At World Bench Press Championships


http://www.keloland.com/Sports/NewsDetail7981.cfm?Id=83355

Leighton powers way to silver medal

http://media.ottawaregion.topscms.com/images/56/72/d6ec5d56407583454ef7d1b78e44.jpeg
http://www.yourrenfrew.com/article/11996

Female Oklahoma City firefighter arrested in steroid sweep will remain on duty

http://www.newsok.com/female-oklahoma-city-firefighter-arrested-in-steroid-sweep-will-remain-on-duty/article/3362337?custom_click=masthead_topten


A female firefighter who was arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor possession of anabolic steroids Thursday will remain on duty as state officials continue the investigation of steroid trafficking

Firefighter Sherry Smith, 39, was arrested on misdemeanor complaint of steroid use, said Mark Woodward, Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs spokesman.

Because the charges involve misdemeanor possession and because Smith has not been convicted, Deputy Fire Chief Cecil Clay said state and federal, as well as union guidelines are pretty clear on the matter.

“We concluded she is not a danger to herself or the citizens of Oklahoma City and she will remain on duty,” Clay said this afternoon. “We can’t just put someone off without just cause, unless they are not fit for duty.”

Smith was one of five people arrested Thursday after a two-year OBN investigation into steroid trafficking, manufacturing and usage in Oklahoma.

Clay said he does not believe a firefighter union lawyer will be representing Smith, because the arrest dealt with her personal life, and is not related to her profession as a firefighter.

“Of course we’re not happy anytime a firefighter gets in trouble on or off duty, but this is a personal matter for her,” Clay said. “It happened off duty and did not involve the fire department at all, except for the fact that she is a firefighter.”

If Smith is convicted of the charges against her, Clay said, the fire department would reassess the situation and take appropriate action.

A Beauty with Brawn

http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2009/4/18/lifefocus/3693071&sec=lifefocus

Beefy Joan Liew turns heads (and elicits comments) wherever she goes.

When Sing-aporean Joan Liew walks past, people gape and heads turn. Yes, she’s attractive, has a presence and oozes sensuality. While she is feminine, she is unlike your typical waif-like model — her body ripples with muscle.

When we step into the gym at Mandarin Oriental Hotel to take a few photographs, the male trainers cannot take their eyes off her. Others steal glances but Liew is oblivious to it all.

Bodybuilder Joan Liew confesses to being vain about her appearance;

“People stare all the time,” shrugs the 33-year-old professional bodybuilder, flexing her biceps.

“This sport is just an extension of my interest in the arts — to create an aesthetically beautiful body out of nothing. You are in control of your body, and, in time, you can create whatever body shape you want,” she explains.

It sure isn’t easy for a woman to build muscles because of the lack of testosterone in the female body, and for that, people salute Liew, who clinched gold medals at the 2000, 2002 and 2006 Asian Women’s Bodybuilding Championship. She also emerged seventh in the World Games in 2001 and competed in the World Amateur Championships in 2007.

For now, Liew is taking a break from competition to focus on expanding her business.

Women tend to shy away from the sport because of the gender stereotypes. Hence, there is a dearth of female bodybuilders in Asia. Malaysia stopped promoting women’s bodybuilding in 1989 because the National Sports Council doesn’t encourage participation, due to the way participants are attired.

Female bodybuilders are often subject to ridicule, and Liew has experienced her fair share of harsh comments. If you’re Asian, female and muscular, you’re typecast as being buff or a lesbian.

“People have told me that I’m ugly, that I will never find a boyfriend, and what a waste since ‘you have such a pretty face’. One fellow even asked me whether I was male or female,” Liew sighs.

On the flip side of things, she also has her admirers and a growing fan base.

“Oh, and I’m very vain,” she giggles. “I believe in being well-groomed. I follow a good skincare routine, moisturise, visit a hair- stylist, wear heels, make up and dress fashionably.”

Starting young

Liew won a gold medal at the Asian Women Bodybuilding Championship.

Although as a child she was not competitive and played games only for recreation, Liew’s inclination has always been in fitness.

“To promote reading habits, my classmates and I had to pick a book from the library when we were nine. And while my friends picked storybooks, I gravitated towards the ‘keep fit’ books. People laughed at me but I was impressed with the pictures of muscular women. I knew I wanted to look like that someday,” recalls Liew.

That same year, while she was attending a friend’s pool party, the young Liew accidentally wandered into an empty gym. Curious, she tried the lat pull and rowing machines, and liked the feeling. At 15, she read her first Muscle and Fitness magazine and was hooked. She couldn’t put the magazine down.

Laugh if you will, but Liew chose her junior college based on whether it had a gym! She joined the fitness club and her job was to trim obese or overweight teens and prepare them for national service. Since she had access to the gym keys, Liew regularly let herself in, read books and trained on her own.

“I was never a fat kid but I saw my body shape changing and became so motivated. It gave me a high. I limited my fast food intake and began eating well. My philosophy is: to get what you want, you have to do whatever it takes.”

While most youngsters would rejoice after their A-level examinations, Liew took a bus straight to the Bronze Gym and enrolled as a member. It was the gym where most high-performance athletes trained, and here, she became even more inspired by the beautiful bodies she saw.

Whether it rained or shone, she pumped iron seven days a week. The young lass began to notice a man who diligently trained by himself in a corner.

“He was always alone and appeared extremely focused. Men cannot multi-task, and his focus was just on winning competitions. So I asked if I could train with him to spur me on,” she says.

The man, Augustine Lee, a bodybuilder, was sceptical. After all, Liew was just a teenager — and a girl.

“Initially, I had my doubts because she was young but seemed very determined,” Lee remembers.

Augustine Lee and Joan Liew are fitness consultants in Singapore.

“I decided to give her a try, and after all these years, we’re still training together!”

Lee, now 55, corrected her technique, offered advice and firmly told her that she had to win when she participated in her first competition. Alas, Liew’s folks were not very happy about her interest in the sport. They tried to dissuade her, although her mother did lend support by preparing Liew’s food prior to the competition. Liew soldiered on.

After seven long years of training, Liew at 24 was ready for her first battle. She competed in the heavyweight category (58kg and above) of the Asian Women’s Bodybuilding Championship in 2000. Although a nervous wreck, she relied on her mental strength to sail through.

“I had been in the circuit and knew how much to push her to the next level. Being an Asian champion is only one benchmark, and I was confident she could win,” says Lee.

When they announced the winner’s name, both were overjoyed. A new Asian champion was crowned. Liew’s parents were happy, but said nothing.

“I was so relieved because I had finally reached my first destination after seven years! Words couldn’t describe my pride. It was an unforgettable moment and I was simply too dehydrated to speak,” Liew recounts.

Training regime

Liew works out with weights two hours daily — three days are reserved for lower body workouts and four days for upper body. If she’s invited to guest-pose at functions, she might spend 15 minutes exercising on the cardio machines for a week or two prior to the event.

If she’s entering a competition, Liew prepares six months ahead. She trims her weight down to 59kg (at other times, it’s around 68kg) and brings her body fat level down to 10%. Once the body fat is too low, the ovaries (which need a certain amount of body fat in order to function properly) stop producing oestrogen and menstruation ceases temporarily.

When she’s not competing, Liew tries to maintain the figure between 15% and 16%.

Her best asset is her back muscles. Every section, from the rhomboids to the trapezius and latissimus dorsi, is sculpted to perfection and pulses with energy.

“My abs are pretty easy to define as well. All I have to do are basic crunches and leg raises without weights, and you can see the six-pack,” says Liew.

“As we age, our muscles start to deteriorate so we have to work harder at it,” reveals Lee, whose physique can put any 20-year-old man to shame.

“We don’t let ourselves miss more than two days of training. When we travel, we make sure to stay in a hotel with gym facilities. We have our ups and downs during a hard day, but training gives me the energy boost I need. It has become a part of my lifestyle,” she says.

Energy source

During competition season, Liew adheres to a strict diet. Breakfast consists of five egg whites, three slices of whole meal toast with peanut butter or jam, and black coffee. The alternative is a protein shake with oatmeal, nuts and raisins.

“If I’m hungry, I eat fruits because I have no time to snack,” she offers.

Lunch is lean meat and green leafy vegetables, rice without gravy, and Coke light. Later in the afternoon, she has a similar meal but cuts down on the rice. For dinner, it’s fish or chicken and steamed veggies prepared by her mum.

“I avoid fried foods and might have some bitter chocolate just to satisfy my cravings. Occasionally, I have durian, and every weekend I have sashimi. I love the Japanese red bean dessert and indulge if I haven’t got any TV appearances or magazine shoots.”

In addition, Liew pops five to six pills every morning: glucosamine, vitamins, calcium and anti-oxidants.

Liew doesn’t smoke and reserves alcohol for special occasions, preferring water instead.

Of course, sometimes she sustains injuries during competitions, but like any athlete, she marches on and prays that they will go away. The training doesn’t stop.

Gym owners

Lee and Liew have since become business partners. In 2005, they opened Fitness Factory, a boutique gym cum fitness consultancy firm in the Boat Quay area. With over 200 clients, the duo is kept busy. The two also spent a year living in Malaysia to help set up the True Fitness gym in Sri Hartamas.

Liew is trying hard to educate women that resistance training is important and encourages them to take up bodybuilding.

“A lot of women have this misconception that they’re going to build huge muscles if they do resistance training but they don’t realise it actually increases your bone density levels. More women are going to the gym but they only focus on cardio training,” says Liew.

Westerners tend to pack in mass quickly due to their lifestyle, diet and body structure. Liew is lucky that she stands at 5’6” and is of average build. Asians tend to dominate the lightweight and bantam categories because of this, while their western counterparts monopolise the heavyweight category.

Liew’s day begins at 5.30am, and she may see up to 11 clients a day, leaving her exhausted with little time for anything else.

“I’ve bought all these books on nutrition but hardly have time to read them. I don’t take appointments on Sundays, so whatever errands I need to do are carried out then.”

By midnight, she retires. Hence, the idea of boyfriends has taken a backseat. The muscle building, though, is top priority in her life.


Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Vibeke Hermansen: Another great European Competitor

I really love the European bodybuilding/fitness scene. Here is Vibeke and looks amazing. The language in the article is not familiar to me but pictures say a thousand words.


Click Here


Monday, April 6, 2009

Bodybuilders to behold, in a natural way

http://www.buffalonews.com/cityregion/story/630283.html
“It’s just a personal challenge . . . as I get older and try to stay healthy,” Lisa Hawley, a 51-year-old grandmother, says as she prepares for the Can/Am event held Saturday at Nichols School.">


“It’s just a personal challenge . . . as I get older and try to stay healthy,” Lisa Hawley, a 51-year-old grandmother, says as she prepares for the Can/Am event held Saturday at Nichols School.">

“It’s just a personal challenge . . . as I get older and try to stay healthy,” Lisa Hawley, a 51-year-old grandmother, says as she prepares for the Can/Am event held Saturday at Nichols School.

Updated: 04/05/09 09:46 AM

Bodybuilders to behold, in a natural way

Enthusiasts gather for competition that shuns steroids, other drugs

NEWS STAFF REPORTER

“He just wants me to touch his muscles,” she said. “He likes to flex his muscles.”

Her fellow competitors chuckled when she mentioned that her little boy knows how to strike the “front double biceps pose.”

Hawley says she is always a nervous wreck about performing on stage, but she loves what bodybuilding has done for her.

“It’s just a personal challenge . . . as I get older and try to stay healthy,” she said before strutting onto the stage in a little purple bikini.

Can/Am winners were: overall women, Amy Bowen of Erie, Pa.; women’s open bodybuilder, Sara Oryszak of Buffalo; men’s open bodybuilder, Chris Rombola of Buffalo; and pro winner, Rico Browning of Cleveland. More results are available at naturalmuscle.com. .

Friday, April 3, 2009

People at Wii like the Bodybuilding.

So for your bodybuilders out there, you know the lifestyle is a a full-time job. Well Wii has a new game called Help Wanted, that allows players to chose a job and earn points by performing that job well. One of the jobs is bodybuilder. Interesting.