Sunday, December 27, 2009

Beaumaris woman’s big body-sculpting win

Beaumaris woman’s  big body-sculpting win

http://leader-news.whereilive.com.au/news/story/surely-she-can-t-be-yes-she-s-53/

BEAUMARIS lovely Lesley Maxwell proved you can be over 50 and fabulous when she won a World Body Sculpture title in New York last month.

Ms Maxwell, 53, was thrilled to pick up the International Natural Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation Pro-Am title in the women’s open segment - an award she called “the big one”.

“It’s always fun beating the 20-odd-year-olds,” she said.

A mother of three 20-odd-year-olds, Ms Maxwell said a strict diet and exercise routine kept her in shape.

It includes daily walks, weight training and a high protein, low carbohydrate diet. And strictly no alcohol, although she admitted to downing “half a glass” of champagne after winning the title.

“It’s not about looking good for your age, it’s just about looking good,” Ms Maxwell said.

“Age is just a number.”

Madonna to Get Professional Help for 'Stringy' Arm Muscles

Madonna is one of the fittest celebs, but gets more hate for that then her personality or wealth. Why?

Check out this article and comment on it on their site. Muscles need the PR!

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2009/12/madonna_gets_professional_help.html

County shows love of lifting weights

By Evan Mohl
The Daily News

Published December 24, 2009

It seems there has been a recent weightlifting boom.

And I don’t mean just lifting weights, but competing in powerlifting and bodybuilding events.

I don’t have statistics to back my claim, but it seems a lot of people I meet are doing what I would call competitive weightlifting, for lack of a better term.

And it’s all age groups. Last week I wrote a story on 67-year-old Lucilla McMahon of Galveston. Back in August, I met Nestor De La Fuente, 19, from Hitchcock. There are many more stories out there, too.

Gyms dedicated to, or at least with a focus on weightlifting, are sprouting up throughout the county. Champions Gym is thriving in Texas City. The Warehouse Gym just opened in League City.

So what’s with all the heavy lifting? Why powerlifting instead of running or basketball?

I have an educated guess after talking to a handful of weightlifters. And those who actually participate in the sport can correct or agree with me.

Just about every sport tests endurances, pushes the athlete and builds strength. But competitive weightlifting offers a lifestyle.

The sport doesn’t just start and stop at the gym. It’s what you eat — which strangely makes up a big portion of who we are. McMahon gave up all meat products while De La Fuente eats six meals a day.

Competive weightlifting is also how you act. Bodybuilders breed confidence and poise. Chris Darby said he often walks around how he might at a competition.

Perhaps, most importantly, competitive weightlifting changes a person’s look. Athletes are cut and chiseled, and it’s noticeable. Walking around that way sends not only a message to society but also to one’s self.

In short, competitive weightlifting is a regimen that someone must follow throughout the day and weeks from eating to sleeping to tanning (bodybuilders) to workouts.

At least, that seems to be the common denominator among competitors whom I talk to. They all talk about the sport as a way of life. And I can see why some find that lifestyle attractive.

Darby Gets Second At Nationals

Chris Darby, of Texas City, got second at the NPC National Bodybuilding Championships in November for bantamweight. He missed getting his professional card and first place by just three points.

Darby, 25, will go into next season with the No. 1 ranking in the country. Pretty impressive.

“It’s a big accomplishment at such a young age,” Darby said. “Next year, hopefully, I’ll get there.

Recreational Achievements

If you have a recreational achievement or story you’d like published, feel free to send it to evan.mohl@galvnews.com or call 409-683-5211.

I’m always looking for people’s stories or accomplishments. Every month, I’ll do a recreational notebook where I run down some of the top achievements in the area.

And who knows, it might just make a great story.



Bodybuilder qualifies for Miss Olympia, Universe

http://www.hidesertstar.com/articles/2009/12/26/sports/doc4b3669b24d4c1889531440.prt

Bodybuilder qualifies for Miss Olympia, Universe

Nicole Simien strikes a winning pose at the Yuma, Ariz., National Federation of Natural Bodybuilding competition. (courtesy photo)

By John Gavin
Hi-Desert Star
Published: Saturday, December 26, 2009 1:58 PM CST
YUMA, Ariz. — In her second bodybuilding event, Nicole Simien of Twentynine Palms struck gold again, winning the “tall” class in the National Federation of Natural Bodybuilding held Nov. 21 here.

The completion is open only to bodybuilders who have not used performance-enhancing drugs for at least three years.

Her win qualifies Simien to compete in the Miss Olympia completion to be held in Los Angeles in August 2010 and in Miss Universe, also in Los Angeles, in November 2010.

“This is a testimony to her commitment,” Simien’s trainer, Shane Friederich, said.

“She went the extra minute of cardio, did the the extra set of weights and was rewarded with a win.”

In the four months before the competition, she arrived at the Five Star Gym in Yucca Valley at 5 a.m. and worked out for two hours.

After each workout, she drove back to the Twentynine Palms Marine base, where she works as a dental hygienist.

“The final two days prior to the events, she restricted her water intake to almost nothing and ate dried fruits. Competitive bodybuilders do this to shrink their skin and enhance their cuts for the show,” said Frederich.

“It’s not easy, but Nicole adhered to the regime.”

Frederich reported his trainee was happy to win, but she was looking forward to eating regularly again.

Simien will take a couple weeks off to give her joints and muscles time to repair. Training will begin again in January as she ramps up for the Miss Olympia and Universe events.

In a previous interview, Simien said, “It takes a lot of self-discipline to compete and keep to a training schedule. You have to push your body to limits it’s never reached before. I’ve learned that it takes an inner strength to gain the outer strength that shows through in competition.”



Copyright © 2009 - Hi-Desert Star

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Q&A With Fern

http://www.norwichbulletin.com/lifeevents/achievements/x1692325812/Q-A-with-Fern-Assard-bodybuilder
Lb1QandA1007.jpg

Fern Assard, 41, of Uncasville, took top prize in the Classic Figure portion of the 2009 National Physique Committee’s Jay Cutler Bodybuilding, Fitness, Figure & Bikini Classic this spring in Boston.

Assard is the accounts manager at Waterford Dental Health and spends her evenings working out and helping her children with homework.

Dissatisfied with what she described as her “skinny fat” body, Assard started working out in 2006. She will take part in one of the first local competitions scheduled for Oct. 17 at New London High School. She also writes a blog for www.bodybuilding.com where she shares her workout videos.

Q How did you get involved in the bodybuilding scene?

A I just wasn’t satisfied with myself. I was dieting, starving myself and anorexic for a while. I got to 98 pounds at one point. I needed to do something to make myself feel better. You look at models and think, “I must be fat. If I diet and diet and diet, I’ll look better.” Everybody thinks, “If I starve myself for a month, I can look like a Victoria’s Secret model.” You can lose weight, but stuff still ends up just hanging in puddles. I wanted to look healthier. I needed to feel better, be more positive so I could like myself more. I joined (Work Out World in Waterford) with my daughter.

Q And all of a sudden you become a first-rate competitor?

A I was really shy before I started doing this. I was afraid to go to the gym by myself. I was like the other women going into the gym. They come in, look at the machine, look around, use one machine and leave. The machines look like medieval torture devices. Nobody knows what to do. I was afraid to go into the weight room with the men. I was reading a Muscle and Fitness magazine one day and saw a professional fitness competitor. She was a mother of three. I thought, “If she can do it, I can do it ...” I knew that’s what I wanted. I did it. I’m 13 pounds heavier since I joined the gym and wear the same size.

Q What is the competition all about?

A It’s called Figure. The women are more feminine, but still have more muscle. I equate it to a muscle beauty pageant, not the traditional skinny model types. I’m on stage in front of hundreds of people in a bikini. We’re not big people or overly lean. You’re not supposed to be overly muscular.

Q And what’s it like to be a winner?

A At my first competition, I went with my daughter. I didn’t have a lot of people backing me up. They didn’t know what I was doing. It was nerve-wracking. It doesn’t really get much easier on stage. People scrutinizing you under the hot lights in nothing but a rhinestone bikini and high heels. They’re looking at everything. They’re comparing skin, muscle tone and overall beauty. I felt like I had accomplished something — totally the opposite than I’ve always been. When you try something, you’re so scared to try it, and then you say, “I did it.” It’s like jumping out of an airplane. My favorite part is when they announce me, they usually throw in “she has four kids.” That usually gets an applause.

ROCK HARD: on being a female bodybuilder

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jjm_nZ245z8_8NR0drWOx--2O38gD9B5VUH80

ROCK HARD: on being a female bodybuilder

NEW YORK — For Tennille Ray, maintaining her sculpted arms, 12-pack abs and muscled legs is a full-time job.

Ray is a professional bodybuilder in the figure division — which means she has eye-popping muscles but is still expected to be curvy and feminine. She has been competing in the World Natural Bodybuilding Federation for about a year, winning her debut and going on to be named Miss Universe at a competition held in Barbados earlier this year against more seasoned professionals.

Ray was fit before — she has been a personal trainer in New York since 2001 — but she didn't consider a career in bodybuilding until a friend at her gym suggested it. Then, an overweight girl told Ray she was so pretty she wanted to see her in magazines — and that if Ray did it, the girl would get in shape, too.

"It really appealed to me, the idea that I could inspire this little girl," said Ray, who hopes eventually to use her winnings for a wellness center for children. So far she's earned more than $5,000.

Last spring, she signed up for a retreat held by a pro bodybuilder that taught some diet and exercise basics. But Ray had to refine her strategy as she went along.

The transformation was difficult. It took her about four months of intense, two-hour workouts and a serious amount of dietary restraint. Bodybuilders eat constantly, but it's a very specific formula, heavy on protein and vegetables and light on sodium and fats, Ray said. She was often cranky and exhausted. She turned down dinner invitations with friends because it would be hard finding something that fit her diet. Giving up cheese was particularly tough.

"I thought, I eat healthy, this should be fine," she said. "I was so wrong. It's a totally different way of thinking. You're eating to feed your muscles, not for enjoyment."

Slowly she noticed her body changing, becoming more sculpted, and her energy returning. Her hard work paid off: She won her amateur debut in September 2008 and turned pro.

"Tennille came in and kicked butt right off the bat," said Charlie Carollo, vice president of the WNBF. "She's really disciplined, but she's also got God-given genetics that really help her out."

Ray, who won't tell her age, works out regularly and brings food everywhere she goes, munching on salad with mushrooms, broccoli and fresh fish during a recent interview. She says she relies mostly on fresh vegetables and natural nutritional supplements.

Other bodybuilders have turned to steroids to make their muscles bulge. The WNBF bans controlled substances and drug tests, and gives polygraph tests before each show to combat drug use.

But even without drugs, women can harm their bodies by becoming so lean, said Meaghan Murphy, features director for fitness at Self magazine.

"You have to have fat on your body," she said. "The nutritional aspects of body building scare me. There are not enough carbs, there are supplements not monitored by the FDA, perhaps they're toying with hormone cocktails. ... It's risky."

Ray is often asked by strangers on the street how she got so fit.

"You don't have to go as extreme as me to be fit," she said. "You still feel good and successful just working toward your own goals."

Here she mentions five proven ways to help keep fit, whether you're on the road to competition or just want to squeeze into a smaller size:

PORTION CONTROL: Step away from that super-size drink. Half the battle of being in shape is knowing when to put down the fork, Ray says. Eat five small meals a day instead of two or three larger ones, and keep in mind that a serving of meat is about the size of your palm. Pastas and other carbohydrates are about a handful, or an ice-cream scoop, and bread is one slice. Veggies and fruits are best raw.

DON'T FEAR WEIGHTS: Weight training is good for you, Ray says, and there's no way the average person will bulk up like a bodybuilder. Bicep curls with more reps and less weight will help you achieve a more sculpted look. Murphy says strength training is essential. "After 35, if you're not doing weight-bearing exercises you're at risk for osteoporoses," she said. "Just two days a week. Light dumbbells to keep bone density in check."

DISCIPLINE: Being fit is a distance event, not a sprint. It's OK to have that slice of pizza or an ice cream sundae, but then get right back on the health horse, Ray says. Bring food from home when you're at work to avoid hidden calories in takeout food, and save the eating out for special nights.

BACK TO BASICS: Calisthenics, such as lunges, squats and push-ups, are some of the best ways to get in shape, but often are sidelined for more exotic exercises. They require no weights, and can be done anywhere. Ray suggests alternating two different exercises, in two or three sets of 15, to tone and strengthen.

DRINK WATER: Ray drinks more than a gallon of water a day, and it's possible you should too, depending on how much sodium you ingest, she said. If you're at work, keep a bottle of water at your desk and refill it at least four times a day. If you're home, refill your glass at least six times, she says.

Thursday, August 6, 2009

Tina Chandler Takes on Shoulders, Tris and Core

This is a great informative workout and gives you an example of just how intense workouts have to be to gain the mass and definition of someone like Tina.

Thanks to Muscular Development for Posting.

http://mdtv.musculardevelopment.com/content/view/2216/225/

Saturday, July 11, 2009

Bodybuilders as art exhibit

I hope this tours.

 

Yaxeni in 1998

Although, she ended up getting bigger and winning some trophies I prefer her look of the late 90s.

Heather Policky has the best legs in bodybuilding and you can watch her train Quads.

Heather's legs are unreal, watch her do squats, hack squats and press. Incredible footage.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/isaac106.htm

Lisa Boushard Trains Back 2 Weeks Before the 2009 NPC Masters Nationals!

RXmuscle takes us through Lisa Boushard's back workout. I got tired just watching it.

http://www.rxmuscle.com/videos/iatraining/479-lisa-boushard-trains-back-2-weeks-before-the-2009-npc-masters-nationals.html

Friday, July 10, 2009

Dominique Dawes Smuggles Guns into Capitol

Dominique Dawes: Click to watch

http://www.tmz.com/2009/05/26/olympic-gymnast-in-the-buff/

http://www.tmz.com/2009/06/17/battle-of-the-babes-who-could-beat-your-butt/

Muscle in the Magic City



http://freeport.nassauguardian.net/sports/294853607597472.php

Flexing their muscles

Shannon Chisholm, Debbie LeCroy and Lee Lance work on their poses for an upcoming body building competition.

http://www.citizen-times.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090609/LIVINGWELL/906090313&template=printart

Power lifter Prepares For World Championship

http://www.kristv.com/Global/story.asp?S=10604126&nav=Bsmj

Female bodybuilding: I eat seven meals a day so I can look like this...




Tonight a TV documentary reveals the Irish mum who puts beauty and brawn into the world of body building

By Celine Naughton
Tuesday June 16 2009

Sophia McNamara is a muscle mama with plenty of pecs appeal -- and even if the 34-year-old mother-of-two from Corbally, Co Limerick has fab abs that Vin Diesel would be proud of, she's all woman and make no mistake.

"I'm known in the gym as the 'Pink Lady' because I'm such a girly girl!" says Sophia, one of the subjects featured in tonight's TV3 documentary, Supersized Shes, a day-in-the-life look at two women preparing to compete in the Republic of Ireland Bodybuilding Federation Championships.

Sophia is no stranger to the world of protein shakes and intensive workouts -- her mother, Angela McNamara, was a bodybuilder when the first wave of Irish muscle women emerged in the 1980s -- but the dark-haired beauty is a latecomer to the competitive sport.

"I only got into it last year after a lot of people, particularly Sean Bullman who trained my mother, urged me to give it a go.

"There are two kinds of competition -- the Figure event, where you just walk on, do a few quarter turns and walk off again, and the Physique event, for which you need to have more muscle and really perform.

"My first competition was a Figure event -- and I hated it! I came second, but I felt nervous and uncomfortable on stage and it took me months to rebuild my confidence."

But when Sophia's confidence returned, something extraordinary happened. "I was persuaded to go for the Physique competition and once I went out on stage, the audience went wild. I posed and did a dance routine to music and enjoyed every minute. It was a great evening."

Sophia was crowned Irish Champion Spring Classic Miss Physique and is now planning to enter up to four more competitions this year.

Her training schedule may sound gruelling to most of us softies, but Sophia embraces the regime. "Before a competition, I need to gain weight, because during training the body burns muscle if there's no fat. So I carb up for six weeks, eating lots of pasta, rice, bread and vegetables. That's followed by four weeks of protein. I have seven meals a day including red meat, chicken, fish and high-protein drinks. I don't count calories or measure portions. I know my body and what works for me. For the final week before a competition I eat nothing but fish, chicken and vegetables."

She also hits the gym for two hours of pumping iron and intensive exercise. "That's the bit I love!" says Sophia. "Even if I never entered another competition, I would still work out."

To present those toned muscles to perfection, some bodybuilders apply fake tan with a paint-roller, but Sophia favours a more precise procedure. "The night before the show, I apply a first coat of fake tan and wash it off at 6am, then apply a second coat and let it dry, then a third. Then, when I have my costume on, I rub Maybelline shimmer bronzer all over."

While the lure of professional competition may seem enticing to some, Sophia plans to stick to her night job as a carer for physically and mentally disabled adults, and being mum to daughter Kim (13) and son Shane (7). "I love being a bodybuilder, but it's just a hobby and that's the way I plan to keep it," she says.

The other subject of tonight's documentary is 26-year-old Inga Beinare, a stunning, 5'9" Latvian blonde who weighed just 8.5 stone when she first came to Ireland five years ago. Now she is delighted to have gained a stone and, while the rest of us struggle to shed the pounds, Inga dreams of building up to 11.5 stone of pure, lean muscle.

"I wasn't a bodybuilder when I met my boyfriend Barry, so he had no idea what was ahead, but he's been very supportive since I started training a year ago," says Inga who competes as a figure bodybuilder when not working as a barber in a Dublin salon.

"Barry helped me with my diet which, for eight weeks before each competition, is free of all fat, sugar, wheat and dairy -- and no alcohol for three months in advance."

If you're wondering what's left, that's right -- carbs and protein.

"For breakfast I have a bowl of porridge and six egg whites," says Inga. "At 11am, it's a high protein drink, then chicken and rice for lunch followed by another protein drink in the afternoon, chicken and potatoes for dinner, a protein drink in the evening and another before bedtime. I try to eat every two to three hours.

"I do cardio training for one hour five mornings a week and weight training for one-and-a-half hours six evenings a week. I have many friends in the gym. Everybody knows me there.

"In Latvia, I saw some pictures of female bodybuilders and thought they looked great. When I came here, people encouraged me to compete and I'm so glad I did. I would love to become a professional bodybuilder and compete internationally. That is my goal."

Supersized Shes is on TV3 at 8.00pm tonight

- Celine Naughton


http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/independent-woman/health-fitness/female-bodybuilding-i-eat-seven-meals-a-day-so-i-can-look-like-this-1774572.html

Bodybuilder Cowin off to Barbados

http://www.caymannetnews.com/news-16284--11-11---.html

Couple muscles in on Universe



http://www.dailymercury.com.au/story/2009/06/19/ware-universe-bodybuilding-emerald-mackay/

Yenny always knocks ‘em out

yenny knocks em
http://www.caycompass.com/cgi-bin/CFPnews.cgi?ID=10383231

Laurel resident goes from victim to survivor

http://www.gazette.net/stories/06252009/laurnew120011_32526.shtml

Normal woman overcomes personal loss through fitness, competition

http://www.pantagraph.com/sports/article_1b5d57ca-6840-11de-ba8d-001cc4c03286.html?mode=image


Trainer ready for CrossFit Games

http://www.daytondailynews.com/daCrossFit athlete and personal trainer Chastity Slone does squats in Practice gym, where she is a level I CrossFit trainer in Troy. Slone will compete in the CrossFit Games on July 10-12 in Aromas, Calif.yton-sports/trainer-ready-for-crossfit-games-190493.html

Sports dieting for body builders

http://www.caymannetnews.com/news-16781--11-11---.html
Published on Eden Prairie News (http://www.edenprairienews.com)

Bodybuilder at 56

Created 07/09/2009 - 12:47pm

The initial goal was to get fit, but Jeannette Stemmer went further

By Kristin Holtz

Meet Jeannette Stemmer.

She’s a 56-year-old grandma with two grown children and a wonderful
husband.

Born and raised in Shakopee, Stemmer has worked at Rosemount Emerson in Chanhassen for 17 years, training employees how to use the company’s equipment. She loves sewing, quilting and traveling with her husband, Pete, to classic car shows.

And she’s a bodybuilder.

Stemmer might not be your prototypical bodybuilder lifting weights on the sand of some California beach with the setting sun gleaming off her sweating muscles, but Stemmer has already seen some success in her training exploits, recently earning impressive honors in a state competition.

“It’s just a goal I really wanted to do and I feel great,” she said.
Stemmer competed at the Mr. and Mrs. Natural Minnesota Body Building Competition May 16. The competition included posing and a 60-second choreographed form routine. At age 56, Stemmer, the oldest participant at the competition, earned third place in the over-45 division and second in novice, which included competitors of every age group.

“I just wanted to say I did it and I’m 56,” she said. “And I won two trophies.”

What might surprise you is that Stemmer never entered a gym until turning 50. Not a self-described athlete, Stemmer began working out casually in the hopes of getting fit. It wasn’t until she teamed with personal trainer Monique Weinandt in fall 2006 that she got serious about her fitness.

Stemmer’s later interest in exercising isn’t all that unusual, local gym trainers say.

Travis Karlen, a recreation supervisor at the Shakopee Community Center, said the facility has seen a big increase in recent years of older adults coming in to work out.

“I think people are a little more aware that being active and keeping active is going to prolong their health,” Karlen said.
Insurance reimbursement programs are a top reason fitness clubs are seeing older adults. The Community Center, for example, offers Silver Sneakers, a fitness program for adults 65 years or older who have insurance with Medica or Humana. Karlen said the center has about 80 seniors involved in the program.

Chris Hawkinson, general manager of Gold’s Gym in Shakopee, said his club also has a seniors’ program and has seen an increase in older adults working out.

As baby boomers continue to inch closer to senior status, Karlen expects to see older faces and bodies working out in the gym.
Bodybuilding

Losing weight and getting fit were Stemmer’s original goal in working out with Weinandt

Then, in May 2008, Stemmer went to watch a bodybuilding competition and a new thought flickered — maybe she could be a bodybuilder. In January, she took the plunge and signed up for a competition.

“It was really hard to go back from our goal because now you have to change [what you’re doing] when you wanted to weigh less,” Weinandt said.

Instead of concentrating on cutting body fat, Stemmer poured all her effort into building muscle. She focused primarily on lifting — exercises like dumbbell curls, bench presses and squats.

Each day after work, Stemmer stopped at Gold’s Gym for an hour-and-a-half lifting session, often accompanied by her nephew, Tim Schmitt, and on Fridays met up with Weinandt at her personal Shakopee gym. Weinandt tried to incorporate non-weight exercises to help prevent injuries and keep it from being boring, but most of the plan was all about reps, sets, pounds, form and safety.

“Jeannette did everything I would ask her to do,” Weinandt said. “She pays so much attention to detail.”

“I made the commitment and I wanted to be the best which I could be,” Stemmer said.

The hardest part, Stemmer recalled, had nothing to do with the gym. Weinandt had Stemmer eating six to seven meals a day — “I even had to get up in the night,” she said — since building muscle speeds up metabolism.

On the day before the competition, Stemmer was down to 108 pounds and 15.1 percent body fat. In order to make her muscles show the best, she dehydrated herself the day of the competition, which thins the skin and makes the muscles show. Stemmer and Weinandt recall going through a quick set of crazy of stretches backstage to get the blood pumping through the veins.

Stemmer doesn’t believe she would have gone through with the competition had it not been for the support of her family, all of whom were at the competition in May. While they were a little surprised at her goal, they have been alongside cheering her on all the way, she said.

“I’m very proud of her,” Pete Stemmer said.

“She is such an inspiration to me and countless other women to lead longer healthier lives and it's not too late to start,” Stemmer’s niece Tammy Shovelson of Eden Prairie said. “I am so proud of my aunt.”

Stemmer plans to compete in another bodybuilding competition in October. Not only has she lost weight and built her muscles, she’s also feeling more confident in herself having achieved the goal she set out for.

“You’ve always had confidence,” Weinandt told Stemmer while the two chatted about the competition in Weinandt’s gym one recent Friday morning. “But now you look like you’ve just blossomed. Like ‘This where I’m supposed to be.’”

Kristin Holtz can be reached at 952-345-6678 or kholtz@swpub.com [2].

Bodybuilding event offers "eye candy for everyone"

photo

Local guys and gals set to muscle up in Toms River

By CHRIS JORDAN
STAFF WRITER

What can physique competition fans expect at the NPC Northeast Grandprix, which takes place Saturday at Toms River High School North?

"Freaks — a lot of freaks," quipped co-promoter Robert Samborsky of Manalapan. "In bodybuilding terms freaks is a positive word. They're going to get guys as big as houses and ripped beyond ripped and walking around with three and four percent body fat."

Are big and ripped guys all there's going to be?

"There's going to be a little bit of eye candy for everyone as there's going to be semi-naked women on stage competing in figure and bikini (contests)," said Samborsky with his Popeye-sized forearms bulging from his short-sleeved shirt. "I'm a big fan of that. Hopefully I'll be a presenter for that."

There will be multiple weight classes for the guys and the aforementioned figure, bikini and fitness contests for the gals. The contests are qualifiers for the NPC (National Physique Committee) national amateur championship later in the year and are open to contestants from across the country. Yet the majority of the competitors come from the East Coast, said Samborsky, co-owner of the Apollon Gym in Edison.

Six-time Mr. Olympia Dorian Yates will be on hand as a judge.

"Hopefully, I'll at least place," said up-and-coming competitor Dana Scott, 25, of Edison.

"Mark my words, there will be a trophy here next week, no doubt about it," Samborsky said of Scott's chances.

The show will include a special presentation from physique star Irina Veselova and the mixed martial artists of the Jersey Fight Club.

"I am a professional physique competitor but I always like to surprise," said the Russian-born Veselova through a translator about her MMA work.

Will Veselova of Old Bridge be getting into the ring?

"They'd have to pay me a lot of money to do that," Veselova said. "I think I'm strong enough to knock someone out but I'd rather not do it."

Additional Facts

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Lisa Auckland Guest Posing

Another video from Mike showing one of the best pose.

Lisa Auckland Guest Posing at the 2007 Maryland Grand Prix from mike pulcinella on Vimeo.

Carla shows how to correctly Pose.

Cool video from the early 90s. Carla was a frequently on ESPN back in the day.

Carla Dunlap interviews Vicki Nixon for ESPN - 1992 from mike pulcinella on Vimeo.

Lucy Wilson training her abs & shouldrs

Lucy Wilson Trains Arms

She trains as she moves closer to her show.

Jen Cowan Deadlifting in Charleston, SC

Check out Jen doing some deadlifts for RX Muscle.

Juliana Malacarne trains Glutes and Hamstrings

RX muscle does a great job with actually explaining what is going on the Voice Over.

She focuses just on the hamstrings and glutes with this.

Click here.

Lisa Carrodus trains legs

Lisa hits her legs hard and creatively in this clip.


Watch lisa carrodus_legs in Sports  |  View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com

Elena Kavva training in gym

Going heavy is the name of the game and Elena follows that mantra here working back.

Click here.

Legend Lenda Murray works Biceps

I had no idea ESPN had great informative shows like this.

Nicole Ball kills her Quads for RX Muscle

Great two part series with Nicole Ball training Quads.

Part 1

Part 2

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

She's since hit the 1000lb mark

http://www.kbmt12.com/sports/41872012.html

Michelle Flexes.

Don't mess: Michelle Obama flexes her famously toned arms in response to a joke about her habit of wearing sleeveless dresses during the dinner

Women flex their muscles

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/glance/813281/body-builders-flex-Veins and muscles were prominent backstage at the IFBB Fitness Cup. (AAP)their-muscles

Ripped Starlet

http://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2009/05/14/51175_ntnews.html


DANIEL BOURCHIER

CHECK THIS OUT: Bodybuilder and all-round stunner Deanne Murphy will be strutting her stuff in Darwin next week

CHECK THIS OUT: Bodybuilder and all-round stunner Deanne Murphy will be strutting her stuff in Darwin next week

INTERNATIONAL bodybuilder Deanne Murphy will strut the stage in the Territory next week.

But the leggy blonde stunner admitted her regimented training - which included three hours of working out daily and protein meals every two hours - was "crazy".

"I get asked if I'm crazy," she said.

"I am at this point in my life."

But the upside is that the 27-year-old ripped starlet doesn't battle confidence issues.

"No, I don't ever have that insecurity," she said.

They may not be bodybuilders but these girls have got confidence too!

Ms Murphy will be in Darwin to judge the contestants in the Natural Female Bodybuilding and Fitness competition next weekend.

The two-time Asia Pacific Figure Champion and former bikini model said she was looking forward to her first visit to Darwin from her home in Sydney.

The competition is the first fully natural female competition run by the World Natural Bodybuilding Federation, and the first in the NT.

The all-day competition will be held at the Darwin Convention Centre on Saturday, May 23.

For further information about the event, call 0401 078 272, or email nt@wnbf.net.au

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Fitness Models Tone it Sexy

Fitness-model trainer Ocean Bloom whips clients into taut form that inspires some to take their new bodies into competition.

It’s hard to believe but Helen Aloiai used to struggle to put on weight.

The Glen Eden bodybuilder says she was always a "skinny chick with abs" and constantly moaned at her trainer that she would never be able to get any bigger.

But a change in eating habits and plenty of hard work in the gym put that right and in 2006 she became the amateur champion of the world by winning the Miss Universe event in Sparta, Greece.

And last month the mother of four added another trophy to a cabinet that could soon be bulging at the seams by taking out the Australian All State Grand Prix.

She never expected to have such success after entering her first competition eight years ago.

"I’d been a gym bum for about 15 years and wondered if I’d be competitive on the bodybuilding circuit," she says.

"So I rang one of the judges and asked him to come and have a look at me. All I really knew about it was what I’d seen in the American muscle mags. Those women were just huge."

Aloiai found that the physiques on show in this part of the world were a lot smaller and she was soon on a winning streak.

"I really enjoyed doing well," she says. "Then one time when I didn’t win I talked to my coach and he said: ‘Well, you actually need to change your shape and get bigger’."

That’s where the new diet came in and Aloiai, who tipped the scales at 86kg in Australia, reckons it took some getting used to at first.

"I had to set my phone to ring every hour and a half to remind me to eat. I’d just have something little like a banana or yoghurt. Then I’d reset my phone and do it again. It took about a month before I stopped feeling sick all the time because I was just always eating. But it was good stuff, not just pies and doughnuts."

The mental health worker went from eating the usual three large meals a day to devouring between eight and 10 smaller helpings.

It paid off in the form of a string of impressive results but Aloiai admits that sticking to the regime was not easy.

"It’s almost like another job in itself," she says. "You have to prepare your food all the time and you’re constantly thinking about what meals you have to cook. It’s annoying and costly."

Handling such a demanding diet is not the only downside to being an elite bodybuilder.

Aloiai is often the subject of ridicule and abuse when she ventures beyond her front door and says people struggle to accept the way she looks.

"I’m not a very showy person and when I go out I tend to cover up. A lot of that is because of the bad reactions people have. That’s why I love going to competitions and being among my own. A lot of my friends are in minority groups that tend to get picked on as well so it’s nice to be among your own people and appreciated for what you do."

She does still suffer a few pangs of self-consciousness when it’s time to take the stage.

"I’m such a nervous competitor. You’re up there half-naked in a bikini in front of thousands of people and you know everyone is picking you to bits. That’s what you do at bodybuilding shows, you critique all the physiques. I’m not very comfortable with that and competing goes against the grain for me. If I could just send them a photo and they could send me the trophy that would be a lot better."

Aloiai had no desire to become musclebound when she first began lifting weights in her early 20s but did not take long to turn into a gym junkie.

"I used to look at the pictures of ladies with muscles on the walls and thought, that’s ugly, I don’t want to end up like that. But as my body started to tone up and I began to see results I was like, wow, that’s really cool."

And despite the challenge of maintaining the lifestyle and putting up with snide comments, she has no plans to pack the weights away.

"I’ve got to the point where I can’t go back now," she says. "The muscle would just go soft or I’d put on fat. I’d never stop training anyway because I love gymwork and pushing weights."

Aloiai wants to have a crack at the prestigious Olympia event but would need to turn professional and spend time in the United States to do so.

Another trip to Miss Universe is on the cards at the end of this year and she will spend the months until then trying to get even bigger.

"It’s a good challenge because there’s always another kilo you can put on, it’s never going to beat you," she says.


Gym Junkie off to World Champs

http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/sport/2372903/Gym-junkie-off-to-world-champsphoto

It’s hard to believe but Helen Aloiai used to struggle to put on weight.

The Glen Eden bodybuilder says she was always a "skinny chick with abs" and constantly moaned at her trainer that she would never be able to get any bigger.

But a change in eating habits and plenty of hard work in the gym put that right and in 2006 she became the amateur champion of the world by winning the Miss Universe event in Sparta, Greece.

And last month the mother of four added another trophy to a cabinet that could soon be bulging at the seams by taking out the Australian All State Grand Prix.

She never expected to have such success after entering her first competition eight years ago.

"I’d been a gym bum for about 15 years and wondered if I’d be competitive on the bodybuilding circuit," she says.

"So I rang one of the judges and asked him to come and have a look at me. All I really knew about it was what I’d seen in the American muscle mags. Those women were just huge."

Aloiai found that the physiques on show in this part of the world were a lot smaller and she was soon on a winning streak.

"I really enjoyed doing well," she says. "Then one time when I didn’t win I talked to my coach and he said: ‘Well, you actually need to change your shape and get bigger’."

That’s where the new diet came in and Aloiai, who tipped the scales at 86kg in Australia, reckons it took some getting used to at first.

"I had to set my phone to ring every hour and a half to remind me to eat. I’d just have something little like a banana or yoghurt. Then I’d reset my phone and do it again. It took about a month before I stopped feeling sick all the time because I was just always eating. But it was good stuff, not just pies and doughnuts."

The mental health worker went from eating the usual three large meals a day to devouring between eight and 10 smaller helpings.

It paid off in the form of a string of impressive results but Aloiai admits that sticking to the regime was not easy.

"It’s almost like another job in itself," she says. "You have to prepare your food all the time and you’re constantly thinking about what meals you have to cook. It’s annoying and costly."

Handling such a demanding diet is not the only downside to being an elite bodybuilder.

Aloiai is often the subject of ridicule and abuse when she ventures beyond her front door and says people struggle to accept the way she looks.

"I’m not a very showy person and when I go out I tend to cover up. A lot of that is because of the bad reactions people have. That’s why I love going to competitions and being among my own. A lot of my friends are in minority groups that tend to get picked on as well so it’s nice to be among your own people and appreciated for what you do."

She does still suffer a few pangs of self-consciousness when it’s time to take the stage.

"I’m such a nervous competitor. You’re up there half-naked in a bikini in front of thousands of people and you know everyone is picking you to bits. That’s what you do at bodybuilding shows, you critique all the physiques. I’m not very comfortable with that and competing goes against the grain for me. If I could just send them a photo and they could send me the trophy that would be a lot better."

Aloiai had no desire to become musclebound when she first began lifting weights in her early 20s but did not take long to turn into a gym junkie.

"I used to look at the pictures of ladies with muscles on the walls and thought, that’s ugly, I don’t want to end up like that. But as my body started to tone up and I began to see results I was like, wow, that’s really cool."

And despite the challenge of maintaining the lifestyle and putting up with snide comments, she has no plans to pack the weights away.

"I’ve got to the point where I can’t go back now," she says. "The muscle would just go soft or I’d put on fat. I’d never stop training anyway because I love gymwork and pushing weights."

Aloiai wants to have a crack at the prestigious Olympia event but would need to turn professional and spend time in the United States to do so.

Another trip to Miss Universe is on the cards at the end of this year and she will spend the months until then trying to get even bigger.

"It’s a good challenge because there’s always another kilo you can put on, it’s never going to beat you," she says.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Tough Love: Holly mom, daughter strengthen relationship bodybuilding

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2009/04/tough_love_holly_mom_daughter.html

by Joe Lawlor | The Flint Journal
Saturday April 25, 2009, 9:07 PM

Sandy Barber and daughter Kristin compete Satruday in a bodybuilding competition at the University of Michigan-Flint.

FLINT, Michigan -- This mother and daughter tandem go shopping together, get their nails done together, pump iron together and compete in bodybuilding competitions together.

Yes, that's right, mom Sandy Barber, 48, and daughter Kristin, 26, work out two hours a day together at the gym to prepare to show off their muscles.

"We're crazy," Kristin said, laughing.

Wearing sequined, homemade bikinis, the two displayed their rippled backs, toned arms and legs and perfect abs at a bodybuilding competition on Saturday at the University of Michigan-Flint.

Sandy pumped 10-pound weights while Kristin performed crunches as they waited their turns to go under the hot lights and pose for the judges.

The Holly women competed in the "figure" class of the competition, which is less about building muscle mass and more about being toned and in incredible shape.

They split their time at the gym between cardio and muscle-toning workouts.

Sandy Barber warms up her muscles while daughter, Kristin, talks on the phone before Saturday's competition.

"I think we look feminine," Sandy said. "You hear a lot of men say, 'Women shouldn't have muscles,' but I think we look good."

It all started five years ago, when Sandy started working out with a personal trainer. Three years ago, she persuaded her daughter to join in. Both are hooked.

"He (her trainer) created a monster," Sandy said, laughing.

Or, two monsters.

Sandy said since she started working out five years ago, she's lost 30 pounds and gained a sleek look.

"I stopped using the excuse that I had three kids as a reason why I didn't look good anymore," said Sandy, who also is the mother of two adult men.

Sandy and Kristin are both 5-feet, 10-inches tall (they wear four-inch heels during the competition to tower over most of the women), and have blonde hair.

They both weigh around 140 pounds, with Sandy being slightly heavier.

And they both strut confidently onto the stage and flash wide smiles, although Sandy insists she gets nervous.

They train for three competitions per year, and each show takes about 12 weeks of maniacal training.

They both follow a strict diet, weighing their food down to the ounce. No pop or pizza. Lots of fish, chicken and vegetables.

Kristin eats raw oats, which she swears taste good.

"I do love cheesecake, though," Sandy whispered.

They also created a side business together making the specialized bikinis used for the competitions. Many sell for more than $500 apiece.

Kristin wore a turquoise bikini while Sandy sported a reddish-brown bikini in Saturday's competition.

Sandy and Kristin Barber, a mother daughter bodybuilding duo, take the stage Saturday in specialized competition bikinis they made.

Sandy is a barber while Kristin teaches. Kristin is engaged to be married to a man who's not into weightlifting.

Will marriage change her workout ways? She says no, that she's in it "for a long time."

"She told me she'd rather have a six-pack than carry a diaper bag," said Sandy, who nevertheless can't wait to be a grandmother.

"Ten years," Kristin said, smiling.

Meanwhile, Kristin's brother, Blake, manages the Web site for their bikini business.

Blake, who's a three-sport senior at Holly High School, is not into weightlifting. He said his friends make good-natured fun of him at school, but he's used to it.

"They'll see the Web site and say, 'Dude, that's your mom? What's going on?' I get a lot of crap," Blake Barber said.

Mother and daughter get along well and said they don't have tiffs.

Maybe it's because it's difficult to argue when you're sweating and short-winded. Or maybe they just genuinely have a great time together.

"This is a lot of fun, and I get to hang out with you all the time," Kristin said, smiling, to her mom.


Never too Old to Pump

http://www.patriotledger.com/homepage/x303484108/Carver-woman-55-takes-on-bodybuilding

boydbuild ak 032409-03.jpg

The Patriot Ledger
Posted Apr 28, 2009 @ 05:15 AM
Last update Apr 28, 2009 @ 10:21 AM

CARVER —
It was 1 a.m., about five hours before Elizabeth Rohde had to rise to prepare for her latest bodybuilding competition. She was having trouble sleeping.

The 55-year-old mother of two was mentally fixated on how she would appear to judges, themselves veterans of the bodybuilding world, as they scrutinize every detail of her carefully-honed musculature.boydbuild ak 041809-72.jpg

“I got up at 1, went into my basement and I just pumped for about two hours and then went back to bed,” Rohde said. “I have to make sure I pump; if you don’t pump, then you don’t have that nice fullness. I’m a perfectionist. I want to have everything under control.”

Later that morning, on stage in a high school gym in Carver, Rohde sought to emit poise and elegance as she flexed. Her husband Mark, an engineer, had helped her apply a tanning agent in the back. She wore silver high heels and a glittery black velvet top, a sharp contrast from the workmanlike sports bra and weight lifting gloves she dons in the gym.

The hairdresser by trade has been on a pursuit of physiological perfection ever since a local bodybuilder introduced her to the sport two years ago.

“I want to be like a sculpture,” she said. “I think you can accomplish that ... I cannot give it up. I’m addicted. I love it. I just love the sport.”

It comes with sacrifice. In addition to keeping a meticulous diet, Rohde had to gradually stop most food and water intake in the days leading up to the competition. She drank just eight ounces of water the day of the event to achieve a look that is dazzling to the eye.

“Your muscle just sucks your skin like really tight, that’s the effect when you don’t consume as much water,” she said. “It’s a diet that you don’t want to be on. You have to deplete your water. You can’t do that all the time. It’s only for competition.”

Rohde left the Spirit of America contest with trophies in three categories, placing first in the novice division. She’ll compete again Sunday in the Jay Cutler Classic in Boston. Unlike the Carver event, where firm but not oversized bodies were the norm, there will not be steroid testing at the Boston event. Rohde expects some “very large” competition.

The New York City native isn’t intimidated. She’s been defying the odds since she was young, when there was violence in her household and her parents divorced.

She dropped out of school in ninth grade, only capable of reading at a third-grade level.

Despite the tough upbringing, Rohde, who currently lives in Carver, always found time for exercise and athletics. She lifted weights through her first seven months of pregnancy.

Rohde and her husband have raised two highly-educated daughters: One attends Harvard and the other Oxford University. Rohde herself was encouraged to go back to school, and earned an associate’s degree in business from Massasoit Community College in Brockton.

At 55, she’s not sure how much longer she can keep up the regimen. She doesn’t even think about it.

“Only God can stop me,” Rohde said. “One day we’re going to go. But while you’re here, why not look good?”


Friday, April 17, 2009

Nelson Wins Gold At World Bench Press Championships


http://www.keloland.com/Sports/NewsDetail7981.cfm?Id=83355

Leighton powers way to silver medal

http://media.ottawaregion.topscms.com/images/56/72/d6ec5d56407583454ef7d1b78e44.jpeg
http://www.yourrenfrew.com/article/11996

Female Oklahoma City firefighter arrested in steroid sweep will remain on duty

http://www.newsok.com/female-oklahoma-city-firefighter-arrested-in-steroid-sweep-will-remain-on-duty/article/3362337?custom_click=masthead_topten


A female firefighter who was arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor possession of anabolic steroids Thursday will remain on duty as state officials continue the investigation of steroid trafficking

Firefighter Sherry Smith, 39, was arrested on misdemeanor complaint of steroid use, said Mark Woodward, Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs spokesman.

Because the charges involve misdemeanor possession and because Smith has not been convicted, Deputy Fire Chief Cecil Clay said state and federal, as well as union guidelines are pretty clear on the matter.

“We concluded she is not a danger to herself or the citizens of Oklahoma City and she will remain on duty,” Clay said this afternoon. “We can’t just put someone off without just cause, unless they are not fit for duty.”

Smith was one of five people arrested Thursday after a two-year OBN investigation into steroid trafficking, manufacturing and usage in Oklahoma.

Clay said he does not believe a firefighter union lawyer will be representing Smith, because the arrest dealt with her personal life, and is not related to her profession as a firefighter.

“Of course we’re not happy anytime a firefighter gets in trouble on or off duty, but this is a personal matter for her,” Clay said. “It happened off duty and did not involve the fire department at all, except for the fact that she is a firefighter.”

If Smith is convicted of the charges against her, Clay said, the fire department would reassess the situation and take appropriate action.

A Beauty with Brawn

http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2009/4/18/lifefocus/3693071&sec=lifefocus

Beefy Joan Liew turns heads (and elicits comments) wherever she goes.

When Sing-aporean Joan Liew walks past, people gape and heads turn. Yes, she’s attractive, has a presence and oozes sensuality. While she is feminine, she is unlike your typical waif-like model — her body ripples with muscle.

When we step into the gym at Mandarin Oriental Hotel to take a few photographs, the male trainers cannot take their eyes off her. Others steal glances but Liew is oblivious to it all.

Bodybuilder Joan Liew confesses to being vain about her appearance;

“People stare all the time,” shrugs the 33-year-old professional bodybuilder, flexing her biceps.

“This sport is just an extension of my interest in the arts — to create an aesthetically beautiful body out of nothing. You are in control of your body, and, in time, you can create whatever body shape you want,” she explains.

It sure isn’t easy for a woman to build muscles because of the lack of testosterone in the female body, and for that, people salute Liew, who clinched gold medals at the 2000, 2002 and 2006 Asian Women’s Bodybuilding Championship. She also emerged seventh in the World Games in 2001 and competed in the World Amateur Championships in 2007.

For now, Liew is taking a break from competition to focus on expanding her business.

Women tend to shy away from the sport because of the gender stereotypes. Hence, there is a dearth of female bodybuilders in Asia. Malaysia stopped promoting women’s bodybuilding in 1989 because the National Sports Council doesn’t encourage participation, due to the way participants are attired.

Female bodybuilders are often subject to ridicule, and Liew has experienced her fair share of harsh comments. If you’re Asian, female and muscular, you’re typecast as being buff or a lesbian.

“People have told me that I’m ugly, that I will never find a boyfriend, and what a waste since ‘you have such a pretty face’. One fellow even asked me whether I was male or female,” Liew sighs.

On the flip side of things, she also has her admirers and a growing fan base.

“Oh, and I’m very vain,” she giggles. “I believe in being well-groomed. I follow a good skincare routine, moisturise, visit a hair- stylist, wear heels, make up and dress fashionably.”

Starting young

Liew won a gold medal at the Asian Women Bodybuilding Championship.

Although as a child she was not competitive and played games only for recreation, Liew’s inclination has always been in fitness.

“To promote reading habits, my classmates and I had to pick a book from the library when we were nine. And while my friends picked storybooks, I gravitated towards the ‘keep fit’ books. People laughed at me but I was impressed with the pictures of muscular women. I knew I wanted to look like that someday,” recalls Liew.

That same year, while she was attending a friend’s pool party, the young Liew accidentally wandered into an empty gym. Curious, she tried the lat pull and rowing machines, and liked the feeling. At 15, she read her first Muscle and Fitness magazine and was hooked. She couldn’t put the magazine down.

Laugh if you will, but Liew chose her junior college based on whether it had a gym! She joined the fitness club and her job was to trim obese or overweight teens and prepare them for national service. Since she had access to the gym keys, Liew regularly let herself in, read books and trained on her own.

“I was never a fat kid but I saw my body shape changing and became so motivated. It gave me a high. I limited my fast food intake and began eating well. My philosophy is: to get what you want, you have to do whatever it takes.”

While most youngsters would rejoice after their A-level examinations, Liew took a bus straight to the Bronze Gym and enrolled as a member. It was the gym where most high-performance athletes trained, and here, she became even more inspired by the beautiful bodies she saw.

Whether it rained or shone, she pumped iron seven days a week. The young lass began to notice a man who diligently trained by himself in a corner.

“He was always alone and appeared extremely focused. Men cannot multi-task, and his focus was just on winning competitions. So I asked if I could train with him to spur me on,” she says.

The man, Augustine Lee, a bodybuilder, was sceptical. After all, Liew was just a teenager — and a girl.

“Initially, I had my doubts because she was young but seemed very determined,” Lee remembers.

Augustine Lee and Joan Liew are fitness consultants in Singapore.

“I decided to give her a try, and after all these years, we’re still training together!”

Lee, now 55, corrected her technique, offered advice and firmly told her that she had to win when she participated in her first competition. Alas, Liew’s folks were not very happy about her interest in the sport. They tried to dissuade her, although her mother did lend support by preparing Liew’s food prior to the competition. Liew soldiered on.

After seven long years of training, Liew at 24 was ready for her first battle. She competed in the heavyweight category (58kg and above) of the Asian Women’s Bodybuilding Championship in 2000. Although a nervous wreck, she relied on her mental strength to sail through.

“I had been in the circuit and knew how much to push her to the next level. Being an Asian champion is only one benchmark, and I was confident she could win,” says Lee.

When they announced the winner’s name, both were overjoyed. A new Asian champion was crowned. Liew’s parents were happy, but said nothing.

“I was so relieved because I had finally reached my first destination after seven years! Words couldn’t describe my pride. It was an unforgettable moment and I was simply too dehydrated to speak,” Liew recounts.

Training regime

Liew works out with weights two hours daily — three days are reserved for lower body workouts and four days for upper body. If she’s invited to guest-pose at functions, she might spend 15 minutes exercising on the cardio machines for a week or two prior to the event.

If she’s entering a competition, Liew prepares six months ahead. She trims her weight down to 59kg (at other times, it’s around 68kg) and brings her body fat level down to 10%. Once the body fat is too low, the ovaries (which need a certain amount of body fat in order to function properly) stop producing oestrogen and menstruation ceases temporarily.

When she’s not competing, Liew tries to maintain the figure between 15% and 16%.

Her best asset is her back muscles. Every section, from the rhomboids to the trapezius and latissimus dorsi, is sculpted to perfection and pulses with energy.

“My abs are pretty easy to define as well. All I have to do are basic crunches and leg raises without weights, and you can see the six-pack,” says Liew.

“As we age, our muscles start to deteriorate so we have to work harder at it,” reveals Lee, whose physique can put any 20-year-old man to shame.

“We don’t let ourselves miss more than two days of training. When we travel, we make sure to stay in a hotel with gym facilities. We have our ups and downs during a hard day, but training gives me the energy boost I need. It has become a part of my lifestyle,” she says.

Energy source

During competition season, Liew adheres to a strict diet. Breakfast consists of five egg whites, three slices of whole meal toast with peanut butter or jam, and black coffee. The alternative is a protein shake with oatmeal, nuts and raisins.

“If I’m hungry, I eat fruits because I have no time to snack,” she offers.

Lunch is lean meat and green leafy vegetables, rice without gravy, and Coke light. Later in the afternoon, she has a similar meal but cuts down on the rice. For dinner, it’s fish or chicken and steamed veggies prepared by her mum.

“I avoid fried foods and might have some bitter chocolate just to satisfy my cravings. Occasionally, I have durian, and every weekend I have sashimi. I love the Japanese red bean dessert and indulge if I haven’t got any TV appearances or magazine shoots.”

In addition, Liew pops five to six pills every morning: glucosamine, vitamins, calcium and anti-oxidants.

Liew doesn’t smoke and reserves alcohol for special occasions, preferring water instead.

Of course, sometimes she sustains injuries during competitions, but like any athlete, she marches on and prays that they will go away. The training doesn’t stop.

Gym owners

Lee and Liew have since become business partners. In 2005, they opened Fitness Factory, a boutique gym cum fitness consultancy firm in the Boat Quay area. With over 200 clients, the duo is kept busy. The two also spent a year living in Malaysia to help set up the True Fitness gym in Sri Hartamas.

Liew is trying hard to educate women that resistance training is important and encourages them to take up bodybuilding.

“A lot of women have this misconception that they’re going to build huge muscles if they do resistance training but they don’t realise it actually increases your bone density levels. More women are going to the gym but they only focus on cardio training,” says Liew.

Westerners tend to pack in mass quickly due to their lifestyle, diet and body structure. Liew is lucky that she stands at 5’6” and is of average build. Asians tend to dominate the lightweight and bantam categories because of this, while their western counterparts monopolise the heavyweight category.

Liew’s day begins at 5.30am, and she may see up to 11 clients a day, leaving her exhausted with little time for anything else.

“I’ve bought all these books on nutrition but hardly have time to read them. I don’t take appointments on Sundays, so whatever errands I need to do are carried out then.”

By midnight, she retires. Hence, the idea of boyfriends has taken a backseat. The muscle building, though, is top priority in her life.