Sunday, January 27, 2008

powerlifting: Holmen's Larsen discovers a new passion

Welcome to Inside Preps

1/26 powerlifting: Holmen's Larsen discovers a new passion

HOLMEN, Wis. — Lisa Larsen was searching for something she would enjoy, excel at, and perhaps push her out of the comfort zone she had spent much of her life in. She was in gymnastics for eight years and basketball for four.

She liked both, but she didn’t have a burning passion for either. Then she discovered powerlifting.

“I got into it because I knew there would be a good environment and I wanted to improve my self-esteem. I knew it would help,” said Larsen, a 15-year-old freshman at Holmen High School. “I would like to get stronger and stuff. With this, I am doing it.”

Larsen was one of 176 competitors who packed the Holmen High School gym on Saturday for the West Coast Region, which serves as a state qualifier for powerlifting. Yes, packed the gym. There were more fans in attendance for this club sport than there are for a number of other WIAA-sanctioned sports — a fact that surprised me.

There were competitors of all sizes — tall, short, strong, lean. And get this: There were almost as many girls as boys.

“It’s an equal opportunity sport,” said Jon Steffenhagen, the Gale-Ettrick-Trempealeau High School football coach who has served as the school’s powerlifting coach since its inception 10 years ago. “You are competing against yourself. And one of the great things about it is there are so many opportunities after high school, for national and world championships.”

One of the neat things about powerlifting — outside of building muscles and establishing a feeling of well-being — is the overall confidence it creates in oneself. Or at least that is what Emily Sue Steck — yes, the same Emily Sue Steck of local stock car driving fame — told me.

Steck got involved as a powerlifter as a sophomore at Holmen, and lifted throughout high school. She’s not lifting competitively at this time, which is understandable considering she’s a full-time college student at Winona State University, working, and building a life with her new husband.

“I remember, it was in a gym class. It was one of those, ‘You can’t do this,’” Steck said, smiling. “I did. The biggest thing to get over is I didn’t want everybody to know my weight. That, and I didn’t want to have so much muscle that it was big and gross. Most girls don’t want to look big and muscular.”

Steck loved powerlifting, worked hard, and got pretty darn good at it, too. By the time she was a senior, she had earned a state championship, then finished third at the national meet. Larsen would love to follow a similar path.

“I’m going to do this sport for the next three years,” said Larsen, who was competing in just her second meet. “It’s a ton of fun. For all of you boys and girls who are not into it, it is so much fun.”

It must be fun. It has to be fun. How else could you explain all the smiles, pats on the back, bear hugs and firm handshakes being passed around the gym? It didn’t take a genius to see these kids were having fun.

Getting stronger, competing, making friends, and pushing themselves to levels they probably never thought possible. Seems like a win-win situation to me. Maybe that’s why powerlifting clubs have continued to grow in popularity in this area, and in Wisconsin.

“Our first year, we had four boys in the original club,” Steffenhagen said. “By the third year, we were up to 50. Now we’re around 60. The state of Wisconsin is on the cutting edge of powerlifting. Louisiana and Texas, they are probably the next two (in terms of interest).”

Steffenhagen said around half of the competitors at last year’s national meet were from Wisconsin.

The interest in Holmen’s powerlifting club is growing — and has been for a number of years — said Chris Sepich, an assistant coach with the Holmen club. Sepich said the club had three kids in its first year (1999), but has grown to 92 kids this year.

Whitehall, with John Kleinhaus coaching the team, has grown to more than 40 members in a few short years.

What is it about seeing how many pounds you can squat, bench press and dead lift? It’s pushing your body, but it’s also about the camaraderie that exists among lifters — past and present — Steck said. That’s why she was among the 120 volunteers at the meet on Saturday. That’s why she was enjoying herself as a judge at one of the competition stations.

“I have always enjoyed it, and I want to be a powerlifting coach some day,” Steck said. “I played volleyball and was in track and field, but powerlifting was a fantastic experience.”

That’s certainly been true for Larsen so far.

“You get a really big adrenaline rush. You get so many butterflies they end up coming out of your throat,” Larsen said. “It has already done so much for me.”

Whitley lifts 410 pounds for win -- OrlandoSentinel.com

Whitley lifts 410 pounds for win -- OrlandoSentinel.com

Weightlifting Girls Sectional

Whitley lifts 410 pounds for win

The New Smyrna Beach senior lands a berth in the girls weightlifting finals.

Ron White

Special To The Sentinel

January 27, 2008

PORT ORANGE

Miranda Whitley brought six bags of Skittles to Saturday's girls weightlifting sectional at SpruceCreek High School.

"I'm going to eat all of them, too, but coach says I can't have them until after the meet," said the New Smyrna Beach senior.

Whitley, though, didn't need sugar to get a rush. The girl nicknamed Skittles pressed 225 pounds on the bench and tossed up 185 pounds on the clean-and-jerk for a 410-pound total in the 183-pound class to earn an automatic berth to the Feb. 9 state finals in New Port Richey.

"This year is mine. I'm ready to get it done," Whitley said of a state title, which she missed by five pounds as a freshman.

To some extent, it's a foregone conclusion.

"I don't have any competition in my class. So my only goal is to beat myself," said Whitley.

She did just that during her sophomore and junior seasons, performing well but losing eligibility for what she said were "disciplinary reasons."

NSB Coach Tim McRae understands that the girl who says she started lifting weights just to give boys in her middle school a challenge could have walked away from the sport.

"Instead, she stayed with it. She's worked hard, and she's earned this," said McRae. "I'm happy for her, and I know she's excited."

Whitley was one of 30 to qualify for the state finals at Saturday's meet. All 13 of Port Orange Spruce Creek's sectional lifters qualified.

The Hawks, vying for their fifth girls weightlifting state championship in as many years, dominated the sectional meet, and, in particular, the 101- 154-, and 199-pound classes, where Hawks finished 1-2 in each.

At 154 pounds, Morgan Candage totaled 380 pounds. Though she matched teammate Kristian Rainge-Campbell in the clean-and-jerk, Candage's 185-pound bench press put her 15 pounds ahead of Rainge-Campbell at the end of the sectional.

At 199 pounds, Spruce Creek's Elizabeth Ensminger took first place with a 315-pound total. In the unlimited class, Winter Springs Shamara Denard took first place with a 375-pound total. Lyman's Enchantre Argo was first in the 139-pound class with a 325-pound total. At 119 pounds, DeLand's Christina Baranet took first with 295 pounds.

Britain's strongest girl is going for gold | Metro.co.uk

Britain's strongest girl is going for gold | Metro.co.uk

Proving that size doesn't always matter, tiny Chloe Lambert has become Britain's 'pound-for-pound' strongest girl by lifting two-and-a-half times her bodyweight.

The 17-year-old, who is just 1.5m (5ft) tall and weighs 44kg (7st), can deadlift 115kg (18st) on her shoulders – equal to 115 bags of sugar.

The student punches above her weight in three disciplines – bench press, where she can lift 45kg (7st), squatlift, where she can hold 97kg (15st) and the deadlift.

Chloe, who wants to be a police officer after she has been to university to study sociology, said: 'My family are all quite into weightlifting and I decided to give it a go.

'My mum and dad weren't happy when I started because I think they thought it wasn't a very feminine thing to do, but it hasn't changed me at all.

'I still like wearing girly clothes and there is no chance of me becoming too muscle-bound.

'The family are all behind me now ukand my two brothers are very supportive and come along to give me a big cheer when I'm competing.'

While not studying for A-levels she works part-time at a DIY store – keeping fit by humping around bags of cement.

Chloe, from Poole, Dorset, holds the British Powerlifting Championship at under-45kg junior level and would love to compete at the 2012 London Olympic Games.

She said: 'To compete at the Olympics would mean me doing different disciplines but it is something I am thinking about.'

Coach Paul Reef feels she will succeed. 'With her body shape and technique, winning an Olympic gold is a real possibility,' he said.

Chloe Lambert

Friday, January 25, 2008

American Gladiators on Local TV

3 CHEERS FOR LIFTING -- OrlandoSentinel.com

A positive weightlifting story.

3 CHEERS FOR LIFTING -- OrlandoSentinel.com: "orlandosentinel.com/sports/highschool/orl-vwcover2408jan24,0,6217008.story"

Matt McKinley

Sentinel Staff Writer

January 24, 2008

Ashley Rivera's typical week can be a strenuous one. Five days of weightlifting, two days of high school cheerleading and three days of club cheerleading and tumbling classes. Such is the life for the Colonial weightlifter and many other girls in the sport. "I have something going on every day," Rivera said. "The combination of cheerleading and weightlifting can get stressful, but I love it." Rivera is not alone.

Six out of nine varsity lifters at Colonial are on the cheerleading team, and much is the same at Boone, Winter Park and throughout Central Florida.

It is an odd combination -- cheerleading and weightlifting -- but one that is equally beneficial. Cheerleading, with its routines and degree of synchronization, can instill discipline.

That helps in lifting, just like the added muscle and energy derived from working with weights can help offset the fatigue from a school-year-long activity such as cheerleading.

"It helps build stamina for cheerleading when you're lifting five days a week," Colonial lifter Cayley Russell said.

Said Colonial weightlifting Coach Sean Groves: "For example, the clean-and[-jerk] motion in lifting and jumping in cheerleading are directly correlated. They're both explosive movements off the ground and require much of the same form."

Female weightlifters train most in the fall and compete nearly every week in December and January. Most girls lift in the offseason, too. Colonial competed in a sectional meet Wednesday at Timber Creek. Those who advance from sectionals will compete at the state meet Feb. 9 in New Port Richey.
Port Orange Spruce Creek, the defending state champion, will host another sectional on Saturday, which will include teams from Volusia, Lake and Seminole counties.
"It's different from cheerleading because all eyes are on the individual to succeed," said Grenadiers lifter Alicia Knorr, who cheers, may run track, is on the yearbook staff and is president of the multicultural club.
Rivera said she does weightlifting because it makes her stronger for cheerleading.
Colonial cheerleading Coach Angie Bonilla said working with weights has helped the girls become more athletic and helped with difficult formations, such as pyramids, that require a strong base.
It also can help smaller girls, such as Knorr, whose added strength in her legs has helped her tumbling.
The mental aspect of girls weightlifting, which first was recognized as a sport by the Florida High School Athletic Association in 2002, has proved beneficial.
Weightlifting involves two exercises - the bench press and the clean and jerk, a movement in which the weight is lifted to the shoulders, then overhead. A lifter's top weights in the two events are added for a final score.
"It's really easy to get discouraged when you practice all week and then can't make the lift in a meet," Russell said. "But when you do get the weight up, it's an awesome feeling."
Rivera knows that feeling better than most. She placed fourth in the state last year in the 169-pound class, lifting a total of 330 pounds.
The state champion, Patrice Doemer of New Smyrna Beach, lifted 365.
Rivera has improved to 380 this year.
"Putting up that new max makes it all worth it,'' Rivera said. "It's a bigger rush than anything else.''
Said Groves: She [Rivera] finished fourth last year but has worked hard since then. She is looking to break the state record at 400 pounds."
Following in Rivera's footsteps, Russell and Knorr originally were cheerleaders and joined the weightlifting team.
"Coach [Groves] saw me working out in a summer-school class [my] freshman year and got really excited," Rivera said. "I benched 95 pounds that day, and he knew I had potential."

AllStars - Kür Sibylle Eleftheriadis

She's a European start on the bodybuilding stage. Beautiful poser and they picked some great music for the video

AllStars - Kür Sibylle Eleftheriadis

Eva Kovalainen's Blog

You guys need to subscribe to this blog. Cute woman with a great physique. Plus you can take notes and see what type of workout you should be doing.

Eva Kovalainen's Blog

San Jose Mercury News - Son, 'American Gladiators' isn't lame

San Jose Mercury News - Son, 'American Gladiators' isn't lame: "to go, Neyshia.


You know things have gone wildly askew when you, as a grown-up TV critic with supposedly discerning tastes in pop-cultural fare, are forced to defend your indefensible love of "American Gladiators" to your teen son.

But there I was one recent night trying to revel in the rock-'em-sock-'em heroics of buffed-up behemoths with monikers like "Crush" and "Fury" and "Venom," only to be continually disrupted by an annoying heckler in the peanut gallery.

"Man, this is sooo lame," David, 17, repeatedly blurted. "And so cheesy. And so dumb."

As I endured this verbal smackdown, I found myself strangely torn. Part of me felt very proud to have produced an offspring intelligent enough to know televisual junk when he sees it. "American Gladiators," after all, is lame and cheesy and dumb.

However, the other part of me -- the part that experiences a surge of shameless thrill when some poor sap sustains a brain-scrambling body slam in "Power Ball" -- was frustrated that David couldn't lighten up and embrace "American Gladiators" as a harmless bit of escapism.

"Just have fun and go with it. Not everything has to be 'Masterpiece Theatre,'" said the man who has expended thousands of words striking out in rage against the mindlessness of reality TV.

I guess I tend to give "American Gladiators" some slack because it represents a trip down memory lane. Years ago, when I covered sports for a living, I wasn't above getting an occasional kick out of watching the firstincarnation of this cartoonish competition series that pits regular weekend warriors against stupendously large human beings in contests of strength and endurance. To me, it was just a good ol' fashioned freak show, teeming with all the elements that so many Americans crave in their entertainment: Amped-up David vs. Goliath-style conflict, repeated blasts of controlled violence, and plenty of skin. P.T. Barnum would have considered it heaven-sent.

NBC's popular update on the franchise hews closely to the original, incorporating "classic" events like "Joust" and a grueling obstacle course called "The Eliminator." But naturally, everything has been juiced up to meet our 21st century standards of spectacle (and to compete with the WWE). And so we get more noise and more lights, larger doses of lame smack talk, much bigger biceps and much tighter Spandex.

We also get the laughable presence of Laila Ali and Hulk Hogan as so-called sideline reporters. The former can't come close to matching her dad in terms of verbal splendor, and the latter grunts and groans and growls as if he's lost his mind. You've gotta love the big oaf, and I do.

But my son clearly doesn't. After watching less than 10 minutes of "American Gladiators," he bolted the room, never able to comprehend the mad genius of it all.

I say, blame his parents. Maybe we should have named him "Crush."

HOW FAR WILL SHE GO? It's unfortunate that the "American Idol" editors chose not to shine the spotlight on Antioch singer Neyshia Go during last week's audition segments from Dallas. Still, eagle-eyed friends say they were able to catch a brief shot of the Carondelet High School senior clutching the coveted golden ticket that signifies a trip to Hollywood.

We can't provide many details because the Fox publicity department does not allow interview access to Hollywood-bound contestants. What we do know from checking out Go's Web site (www.neyshiago.com) and video clips is that she's a small girl who packs a big voice. A member of her church choir, she has sung the National Anthem at 49ers and Giants games and has performed at the famous Apollo Theatre in New York. She's a big fan of Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, Celine Dion and Beyonce.

Just because she wasn't featured in the audition segment doesn't mean Go has no chance to advance. "Idol" history demonstrates that some performers never spotted in the audition rounds have made it into the Top 24. Way to go, Neyshia.

ARE YOU A 'SURVIVOR'? East Bay favorites Vecepia Robinson, Yul Kwon, Chad Crittenen and Yau-Man Chan, among others, have had a taste of fame on "Survivor." Now comes your chance.

The popular reality series is holding an open casting call Saturday in the Bay Area. Hopefuls must meet the eligibility requirements and report to the casting call with a completed application form, available at cbs5.com. (Warning: The form is 19 pages long.)

The event will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Metro PCS, 5769 Christie Ave. in Emeryville -- the hometown of the latest East-Bay castaway, Mary Sartain, who makes her debut when the show returns Feb. 7.

Monday, January 21, 2008

What contenders need to know to survive Venom’s Strike!

http://intheloop.ivillage.com/showarchives/date/0,,cl8vg38k,00.html


What contenders need to know to survive Venom’s Strike!

VenomHang Tough – Be quick and coordinated because I am going to attack hard.

Wall – Focus on each rock, because I am charging up the wall right behind you.

Hit and Run – Be sure to look both ways because I want you in the water.

Joust - Be aggressive, but you are still going to see the tank.

Power Ball- Be quick and fast, it is about speed. I’ll hit you like a Mack Truck

Pyramid – GOOD LUCK WITH THAT ONE!

Gauntlet- Be quick and fast because I am staying in your way.

Earthquake – Stay low and use your leverage for what it is worth, because you are going down.

Assaults- Be quick and have good aim, mine is getting better everyday.

Eliminator- You’ll need a conditioned body and good lungs stamina. The Eliminator sucks the juice out of you in seconds.

Get more information on Venom on her website.

Visit the American Gladiators website.

Leaner Lena Headey too 'emaciated' for role in the TV Terminator | the Daily Mail

Leaner Lena Headey too 'emaciated' for role in the TV Terminator | the Daily MailBritish actress Lena Headey has been criticised for looking too "emaciated" to play iconic action heroine Sarah Connor in a new Terminator TV series.

While the show made an impressive debut, with more than 18million US viewers last week, Headey's lean physique has quickly been put under the microscope, with some deeming her unsuitable for the part.

Scroll down for more...

Slender: Lena Headey is under fire for her 'toothpick-thin' physique

Action: The actress plays Sarah Connor in the new American series

The role was first made famous by iron-pumping Linda Hamilton in Terminator 2: Judgment Day.

Hamilton turned the character into a "butt-kicking inspiration to millions of women," according to the Los Angeles Times.

But now a critic writing for the paper says: "Some who worship at the altar of Sarah Connor detect heresy in the casting of Headey, who's healthy-looking and attractive but not exactly Ms Olympia."

Scroll down for more...

Muscles: Linda Hamilton got seriously toned for her role in Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Others are less gentle in their criticism of the West Yorkshire-born actress, whose films credits include The Remains Of The Day, 300 and St Trinian's.

Under the microscope: the British actress' new show is a hit but her body has attracted criticism

Enlarge the image
Boston Herald critic Mark Perigard wrote: "I'd like to give her time - and some pasta - to help her grow into her jeans. Headey looks remarkably like actress Lara Flynn Boyle. She's a twig of an action heroine."

The Sarah Connor Charm School, a Terminator fan group which focuses on "physical feminist empowerment", is also unimpressed by the choice.

The group's spokesperson Kym Lambert said: "We were very upset to find out that a very thin and non-athletic actress had been chosen out of, supposedly, hundreds to play a role that we as physical feminists found so inspiring."

British feminist and novelist Bidisha echoed the group's concerns.

She said: "I am shocked to find out that the producers are clearly sanctioning a new, weedy silhouette in such an iconic and genuinely groundbreaking role.

"There are two issues here: having a toothpick-thin, feeble-looking Sarah Connor is a crime against the iconography of the character; and presenting a clearly emaciated actress as a heroine is a crime against women."

For her part, Headey has played down the unflattering comparions to Hamilton, blaming her lack of bulging biceps on a shortage of time to work out.

She has said: "The film had the luxury of more money and more time."

"If they were going to give me a month, and a trainer every day, and a chef, then it would be fantastic... it's a TV show, for God's sake!"

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, which also sees British star Owain Yeoman fill Arnold Schwarzenegger's original part, will air in the UK next month.

Sunday, January 20, 2008

Interview with Erika Andersson

Good ambassador for the artform
The Muscular Asian Woman - Asian Female Muscle, Physique, and Fitness - 女筋肉美: Interview with bodybuilder Erika Andersson

ExtremeWhey.com We bring You real Deal

Olga needs to win some awards too. She's what bodybuilding has to be. Click this link for some more pics.
http://www.extremewhey.ru/img/sportsmens/gurieva/gurieva_6_big.jpg

GeneX Magazine > shawna walker, larissa reis, michelle jin, wrestling, tracey toth, kira neuman, female bodybuilding, cindy phillips, britt miller, ca

GENEX's Bodybuilding and fitness awards

I like the fact that he does this every year. Shows he puts some thought into the sport.

Iron Man's Hardbody Photos Pics Images Videos Movies Wallpaper Desktops

Small Gallery on Ironman's (not Tony Stark) website, with a few samples of Dobbin's works best of all is a shot of Lenda Murray. I miss her

Iron Man's Hardbody Photos Pics Images Videos Movies Wallpaper Desktops

BBC News Player - High hopes for UK bodybuilder

BBC News Player - High hopes for UK bodybuilder

YouTube - Hypnotist Bernie's Exposition- Episode 13 Pre-show Interview

I'm hypnotized by her biceps.

YouTube - Hypnotist Bernie's Exposition- Episode 13 Pre-show Interview

YouTube - Female Fitness Competitor Gets Ready For Event

YouTube - Female Fitness Competitor Gets Ready For Event

Not sure the event but I know it wasn't my grandmom's 90th birthday party.

Lisa Lyon

Terrible Quality but it was done decades ago so I'll let it pass.

YouTube - Lleyton Hewitt's bodybuilder sister at 4am

She could totally kick his ass.

YouTube - Lleyton Hewitt's bodybuilder sister at 4am

Saturday, January 19, 2008

How do I get traps like these? - Bodybuilding.com Forums

Funny Thread

How do I get traps like these? - Bodybuilding.com Forums

Oldie But Goodie III

Love stories like this

Daily Nebraskan - For Lopes, running many events could be a hurdle

Priscilla Lopes is ripped.

She's so buff, in fact, that when the sprinter arrived at Nebraska, she intimidated some of her male teammates.

``My freshman year when I came here Mark (Harrison) and Courtney (Jones) were like, `Oh man, she's jacked,''' Lopes said. ``But then they got to know me and they were like, `Oh, well she's jacked, but she's a really sweet person.'''

The junior said being genetically built the way she is has helped her in her running and made some of the hurdles in her sport a little easier to overcome.

However, Lopes doesn't want people to judge her on her physical appearance.

She said once people can get past it and get to know her personally, they would find that she's a really nice human being.

``Her nickname's Sweetness, that's what we call her,'' Harrison, a senior, said. ``The first time I've ever seen her she was the most intimidating person at high school nationals. But she's cool when you get to know her. That's just how she is on the track.''

Lopes' physical attributes will be put to the test this weekend.

The Whitby, Ontario, native is scheduled to compete in three events at the Big 12 Conference Indoor Championships, which begin today at 9:30 a.m. at the Bob Devaney Sports Center.

Lopes will be running in the 200 meters, along with her two specialty events, the 60-meter dash and the 60-meter hurdles.

As the defending conference champion in both 60-meter events, Lopes said she isn't feeling any added pressure to repeat her performance from last season.

``It's not a good situation to put yourself in,'' Lopes said. ``You just got to go out there and do what you're comfortable doing and execute your event and not worry about what people are saying.''

NU Sprints/Hurdles Coach Billy Maxwell said Lopes' competitiveness would help her do all three events.

Maxwell, who has been coaching track for more than 30 years, described Lopes as one of the best competitors he's ever coached.

Although Lopes has only run the 200 once this season - she ran a personal-best and NCAA provisional-qualifying time of 23.82 at the Nebraska Triangular on Jan. 28 - Maxwell has no doubt she can place in the event.

``That's why we put her in there,'' Maxwell said. ``The coaching staff has every expectation of her placing.''

Lopes is hoping there will only be semifinals and finals rounds for the events, which she said would depend on how many runners are seeded in the events.

If she is forced to run in preliminary races, Lopes said it would definitely take a toll on her body because she would have to run five times today alone.

In order for her to get through those potential physical demands, Lopes said she has to stay mentally strong and keep receiving support from her teammates.

Furthermore, her race strategy will be important, Lopes said.

``I don't want to push myself and drain myself early,'' Lopes said, ``because I still have another day to run. I just have to listen to my body and know when to push and when to back off.''

With everything in place for her to defend her individual titles and lead the women's team to its third consecutive team championship, Lopes said she's going to treat the meet like any other.

Although her muscular frame may have intimidated some teammates early in her career, Lopes said she knows they now judge her on her performance and personality.

``I just stay humble and be quiet at certain times,'' Lopes said. ``And then when my teammates need me, then I'm going to be vocal and yelling for them. That's just how I am. If I intimidate them then I intimidate them. I'm sorry (laughs).''

PopMatters | Columns | Robert Collins | Sticky Wickets | The Zen of Cheating

Opinions on Steroids are everywhere these days.
Robert Collins |The Zen of Cheating

Leyton Hewitt's Sister Will Kick Your Ass | Mr. Irrelevant

Leyton Hewitt's Sister Will Kick Your Ass | Mr. Irrelevant| January 19, 2008

Hewitt beat Baghdatis today in an epic five setter which ended at 4:40 AM Aussie time (the latest match in grand slam history). During the match, the cameras were constantly on Hewitt’s box, probably because his wife is smokin’ hot. But seated next to her was Hewitt’s sister, who — as Chris Fowler pointed out — is a professional body builder. Personally, I think she needs to work on those abs:
hewittsister.jpghewittsister2.jpg

Now here’s the real question: Is that hot? For precedent in deciding such a difficult question, I turned to Pink. She has the similar, almost manish, abdominal region, but I’ve always contended that Pink is indeed hot.

Does that make me gay or something? Probably not. But if I were to say Can’t Take Me Home was a better album than Misundaztood, now that would most certainly make me homosexual. Everyone knows Misundaztood is her crowning achievement.

UPDATE: Thanks to twoeightnine, there are a pair of SUPER SEXY photos of Hewitt’s sister after the jump.

UPDATE II: Thanks to Meech, there are some photos (also after the jump) that are actually super sexy (see, ’cause in the previous update I was using sarcasm).

Jaslyn Hewitt is Lleyton’s Bodybuilding Sister | Huliq

Jaslyn Hewitt is Lleyton’s Bodybuilding Sister | Huliq

Jaslyn Hewitt is making headlines today with her new bodybuilding look and many people are wondering who is she. The story published at Rightpundits reveales her biography and writes that Jaslyn Hewitt is the bodybuilding sister of tennis player Lleyton Hewitt

As a biography, Jaslyn Hewitt is 24 years old and hails from Adelaide, Australia. She is a former tennis player. She is the younger sister of Australian tennis player Lleyton Hewitt. She is now well on her way in the bodybuilding world.

She went through a rigorous training regimen and competed in the women’s novice figure category of the SA Natural Physique Title in October 2007, where she placed 2nd. Pretty good considering she only took up the sport six months prior.

Jaslyn Hewitt, a tennis coach for Tennis SA, rid her body of 12 percent body fat during her training. She wanted to compete in figure events only, and didn’t want to “bulk up like a she-man”. (I dunno, judging from the pictures, she looks bulked up to me). Personally, I think her modeling pictures (see below) are much hotter!

Source: By Rightpundits.com

Jaslyn Hewitt used to be a professional tennis player and now she has become a professional bodybuilder.

Thursday, January 17, 2008

American Gladiator Tryouts

The Middle Show - American Gladiators

Add to My Profile | More Videos

Oldie But Goodie Part II NY Times

WORKING OUT WITH: Lenda Murray; Wonder Woman In the Flesh

WHEN Lenda Murray struts into a weight-lifting room, grown men freeze in mid-grunt.

Those lats!

Those pecs!

Those quads!

Ms. Murray is Ms. Olympia, the goddess of the body-building world and a rock-hard, in-the-flesh assault on conventional assumptions about beauty, strength and femininity.

"Sometimes, I think I scare people," she says, straddling a bench and effortlessly curling a pair of 22 1/2-pound dumbbells.

Ordinarily, Ms. Murray would spend one to three hours in the gym; that's her daily routine for most of the year. This morning, though, she's working out only for a few minutes at Better Bodies in the Chelsea section of Manhattan. The scene is mainly a photo session, one of many the three-time Ms. Olympia has endured since she first won the title in 1990. (It also explains the dangling earrings and extensive eye makeup.)

"I may come back to work out this afternoon," she says.

Ms. Murray is in New York for just 18 hours, the length of her stopover on a flight from Luxembourg, where she appeared last month in an exhibition, to Southfield, Mich., the Detroit suburb where she lives when she isn't traveling to endorse products, make appearances or pose for muscle magazines -- enterprises that will bring her about $300,000 over the next year.

The pro body-building season for women essentially consists of one major event: the annual Ms. Olympia competition, which was held on Oct. 17 in Chicago. So, Ms. Murray can now take a break from her spartan training regimen and low-fat, high-discipline diet.

"I'm really looking forward to lunch," she says.

Ms. Murray, who is 30 years old, started body-building 10 years ago. Initially, she joined the local gym to help thin her thighs so she could make the Dallas Cowboys' cheerleading squad; she had made the next-to-last cut, having prepared for two years by pumping pompoms for the Michigan Panthers of the now-defunct United States Football League. As she worked out, though, her thighs didn't shrink. In fact, they grew even larger.

During this Sisyphean struggle against size, some male weight lifters noticed her swelling musculature, and they encouraged her to take up professional bodybuilding. Her only experience in competitive sports had been running track in high school and in college at Western Michigan University, where she earned a degree in political science. It wasn't long, though, before she had gained 20 pounds and was doing squats with a 315-pound barbell resting on her shoulders. Eight repetitions, no less.

"It was something that I never thought about, never knew anything about," Ms. Murray says. "But they said I was a natural."

"Natural" in female body-building, though, means having a classic V-shaped male physique: broad shoulders and wide clavicles on a taut torso that tapers to a narrow waist. It means long leg and arm muscles with short tendons. It means little body fat (about 11 percent compared with about 25 percent for most women.)

Indeed, without this foundation, which is derived from genetics and hormones, sculpting a body into Schwarzeneggerian shape is virtually impossible, regardless of sex, diet or exercise program.

"Her hamstrings are so-o-o-o-o long," says Darren Tervel of Queens, one of a couple of Better Bodies bodybuilders who have brought cameras to the gym and are clicking away. "I can squat a lot -- 425. But I bet she can squat a lot more. She's an inspiration."

The Ms. Olympia competition, which is sponsored by several sports-equipment companies and magazine publishers, has been held every year since 1980. Rachel McLish won the first title, and Cory Everson won six straight from 1984 to 1989. There are 20 contestants, each of whom has to win qualifying rounds. This year, the title brought Ms. Murray $35,000 of the $100,000 in prize money offered.

"The real money comes with endorsements and appearances," said Wayne DeMilia, the chairman of the professional division for the International Federation of Body Builders, which is based in Montreal.

In a sport in which the use of steroids and other muscle-building drugs are believed by many to be commonplace, Ms. Murray says that she doesn't use drugs to build her body, adding that three months before a competition she just increases her gym time to eight hours a day, six days a week. She follows a pattern of three days on the upper body, three days on the lower, then one day off.

She also cuts her diet to 12 grams of fat a day, with high-protein, high-carbohydrate food -- five rations of skinless turkey breast or fish, and rice or a baked potato, without butter or sour cream, of course. Then, four weeks before the contest, she forgoes the rice and potatoes. "You start craving, for a whole month, for a potato," she says. "If I could just have a potato, just one, with nothing on it. . . ."

The draconian diet, which also restricts salt, removes excess fat and water under the skin and creates that prized "ripped" look of sharply cut muscles covered by bulging veins.

Bodybuilders also spend the last few days before a competition lifting weights to build up only their least developed muscles. This way, they hope to have the most symmetrical stature possible.

"You look like an anatomy chart," says Mr. DeMilia as he watches Ms. Murray work out.

While such a description is not the most flattering accolade for most women, Ms. Murray's linebackerlike physique is generally admired in most weight rooms, especially at a serious, no-socializing training center like Better Bodies. "Lenda Murray can walk into any gym in the world and everyone knows her -- she's a star," Mr. DeMilia says. "There are pictures of her all over the wall."

Elsewhere, though, Ms. Murray can draw dumbfounded gawks and stares. "People sometimes don't know what to say when they see me," Ms. Murray says. "They say something like 'You're so big.' I just say, 'Thank you.' "

Such a situation occurs as she takes off her coat in the lobby of Le Madri, an Italian restaurant nearby.

"You . . . lift . . . weights?" the hostess asks, her eyes widening.

"Yes, I do," Ms. Murray replies pleasantly.

In competition, when she's down to 7 percent body fat and wearing a Band-Aid-size bikini, it is her enormous, overly defined thighs, more than anything else, perhaps, that make her look like Wonder Woman.

Up close and in street clothes, however, Ms. Murray's shoulders, back and arms are the most striking elements of her body, even when they are covered by a sweater, as they are today. Though she is relatively short -- 5 foot 5 -- and weighs about 155 pounds, she looks a lot bigger.

Ms. Murray, who spends her downtime on the road reading mysteries and doing macrame, speaks like one with experience on the interview circuit. She politely tells a reporter when his tape has run out. At lunch, she even requests a pasta that doesn't require twirling, which, she has learned, could lead not only to splattered clothes but a feature story that includes phrases like "As she slurped up a string of spaghetti. . . ."

So, she cautiously orders little ears of pasta with sausage and cheese. (Note: She passes on the extra Parmesan cheese and the dessert menu, and doesn't once dip her Tuscan bread into the dish of olive oil.)

She does have a glass of Soave. "I'm treating myself," she says.

She is also drinking every drop of her water, a habit left over from training. "In order to lose water, you have to drink a lot of it," she says. "One of the myths is that to lose water, you don't drink water. But to lose it, you have to drink a lot of it because the body is so smart, so complex, that when you don't drink it, it tries to hold on to it."

Ms. Murray, the second oldest of six children, all girls, said her parents were initially puzzled by her career choice. "But now," she says, "they are proud that I am a success."

Like many bodybuilders, Ms. Murray hopes to segue into a film and television career. Before she won her first title, she worked as a personal fitness trainer and in the human-resources department of a computer company. She and her fiance, Derrick Russell, an engineer, plan to move to the Hollywood area next year. She has already been the host of a "Muscle Magazine" show about weight lifting on ESPN and has auditioned for a small part in a movie.

Still, Ms. Murray concedes that there may be a limit these days to how much muscle the world wants to see on women. "I don't know if Hollywood is ready for a bodybuilder at my level yet," she says.

She adds, though, that society's concept of a fit woman is constantly evolving. "There's definitely a craze, a lot of people starting to realize what weight training does for the physique," she says. "In order to get shapely, you have to do some kind of weight lifting. Aerobics, losing body fat, cardiovascular -- that has nothing to do with shaping."

She notes that today's women have more muscle than the Jazzercized women of 10 years ago and look entirely different from the fleshier feminine ideal of earlier decades.

She also points out that in many of today's futuristic movies, the women, like Linda Hamilton in "Terminator 2," have hard, strong bodies.

"In the future," she says, "I see a very muscular woman being able to walk into a restaurant and people not thinking that's something that's totally weird."

Oldie But Goodie Part ! Craigslist Rant

Originally Posted: Sun, 15 Oct 13:05 PDT

Rant - Muscular Girl FAQs


Date: 2006-10-15, 1:05PM PDT


I’m not the ranting type and I doubt I have half enough rage to make this a good one. But, I’ve still got to get it out of my system.

Okay, here’s the deal: I lift weights. Some people collect stamps, some people play soccer, I lift weights. And, I’ve got a muscular physique as a result. I’m not huge, probably because I'm just not designed to get body-builder big. Here are the answers to the FAQs so you won’t have to wonder about the rest:

1) Yes, I was born a female. Did you just win $5 from a friend who bet you that you weren’t enough of a jerk to ask me that?

2) No, I’m not on steroids. I lift weights and eat right. Look, do a few hours of Madden 2004 and a few bonghits get you a few steps closer to the Madden Bowl? Of course it does. Likewise, what I did with my two hours has made my delts show. By the way, nothing wrong with a nice BH of something decent. I'm into lifting, not nunnery.

3) Yes, I do want attention. Are you kidding? Who doesn’t? But, I’m not some desperate self-esteem case that wants the approval that daddy never gave me. But, just like the girl with the c-cup rack, I like to show off my best assets. Thing is, my best assets are my shoulders and arms and that’s why I have 5 different colors of the same tank top. Yes, I know it’s 48 degrees out tonight but I’m still not wearing a jacket and neither are the other girls waiting in line.

4) No, I will not flex for you. For god’s sake, why would you ask that? Didn’t you realize that you said that loud enough for everyone at the party/in the train/in the next booth over to hear that? Don’t embarrass me. Back to the girl with the c-cup, did you shout for her to flash a bare nipple at you? So, why would you ask me to “flex” for you? Look, I have a decent face, and hard-earned muscle definition. I’m glad you noticed. I’m proud of it and I’m happy to talk your ear off about lifting and creatine and metabolic optimizers if you want. But, just don’t make me feel self-conscious about it. Flatter me and give me just a smidge of an opportunity to show some false humility about it.

5) No, I’m not into girls. Please. Sure, if Jessica Biel wanted me to get boozy with her and then asked me if I ever “feel confused” I’m sure I’d consider a little exploring and spelunking. But, otherwise, guys only.

6) No, I will not “have your back” if you decide to give the evil eye to the chick who took your boyfriend/took your spot at the bar/spilled Corona on your shoe/left pee on the toilet seat just before you went in. I’ve never been in a fight and I don’t even do tae-bo. I know, the guns made you think otherwise. But my combat style would consist of running away and flailing my arms and I’d probably add a urine puddle just for good measure. By the way, don’t point a “that’s my bodyguard” thumb my way across the room and think I didn’t notice. I don’t care if you get your ass kicked, just don’t make me run tonight, I already worked out today.

7) No, I don’t date bodybuilders only. First of all, professional bodybuilders don’t workout at Seattle Fitness. Okay, maybe Golds. I’m not sure where they go but they do it as a full-time job and don’t have much of a life outside liver tablets, distilled water and sleeping 10 hours per day. Will I date a guy who is 50 pounds overweight and a smoker? I dunno. Do I like guys with muscles? Heck yes. Doesn’t your girlfriend? So, don’t ignore me just ‘cause you think I’ll beat you in armwrestling.

8) Yes, I did sweat some of my boobs away but I’m at a B even on a good day. Just remember that boobs are fat and I’ve tried to get rid of most of my fat so that you’ll think I have nice quads.

9) Yes, I attempted to compete in a few bodybuilding competitions and I didn’t even place. I know I look buff when it’s my turn to break at Belltown, but it takes 12 hours per day of commitment to win those things and I have a full-time job that pays better than the gamble of trying to be a full-time bodybuilder.

10) No, for the love of god, do not strip down to your wife-beater at the party and show me your biceps. Not only will I not return the pose, I’ll probably bolt because now you’ve made a scene and made me paranoid that the nice looks I was getting are actually unfriendly check-out-the-freak stares.

11) No, I have not considered professional wrestling. First of all, please see question 6. Second, I’m 5’5,” so even with 3” of heels I don’t make the cut for modeling, wrestling or probably even walking the round number card at a Toughman Contest.

12) No, I’m not protesting too much by going on about my muscles, my guns, etc. Look, just like any girl or guy who likes their body, I don’t mind getting nice attention for mine. I work hard at it and I think I look good. The big boobed girl wants you to look at her chest, the guy with the washboards wants you to “force” him to take off his shirt and I enjoy your admiring glances at my guns. Maybe I’ll cut back on the lifting someday or maybe even squeeze out a few kids and grow an ass. But for now, I’m that chick with the muscles. Please be a cool guy about it.

13) Yes, I saw the episode of Entourage, I don't think she was all that built and I didn’t know who Evander Holyfield was until I saw that episode.

14) No, I don’t like to “take control” in bed, I don’t like it rough and I don’t think it’s physically possible to fuck someone to death. By the way, I heard you say that to you buddies after I walked in. Keep your stupid voice down and get some manners.

15) Did you just touch my arm? Dude, what the hell? You just walk up to random people and squeeze their arm? Did you think that if you grabbed my upper arm as I walked by, I’m going to stop and a spotlight will light me up as I strip into a posing bikini and do a front double-bicep for you? If we’re dating, dancing, having sex, or saving me from a burning building, feel free to touch my biceps all you want. Otherwise, you’re just gropy and I’ll do everything I can to act startled and accidentally spill my drink on you.

16) No, I have not considered being a stunt-woman. Extrapolate from Question 6.

17) Sure, I will come over for a photo session with you. Simply show me your business card that identifies you as a professional photographer with a website that lists the various fitness magazines or commercial products who purchase your photo work. Oh, you usually do artistic photos? Oh, that’s okay, again, just hand me your professionally produced business card that directs me to your website that shows your years of photo work and dedication to the arts. Oh, you just do photography as a hobby? Sure thing, just give me the address and time of night you’d like me to come to your apartment. Should I come alone wearing my bikini and an overcoat? How long should I stay? Do I have to blow you or can I just use my hands?

18) Absolutely, I’ve seen the websites with muscular girls oil wrestling and I’m totally going to sign up for one of those. Yep, you’re right, maybe they’ll pay me even more than $1,000 to have some 40 year old anger-management dropout put her ass in my face. I mean geez, I’m sure my parents, friends, family, present and future employers have never heard of video downloads circulating on the internet so I’m totally into it.

19) Yes, I think I could probably lift you up, and possibly lift you over my head. I get this question from time to time. Where in god’s name did that fantasy come from?

20) Yes, you can ask me how or why I got into lifting. I enjoy talking about it. But, you cannot shout across the room all of your jerk theories about why I lift such as the fact that I’m a tranny/I’m a lesbo/I need a man/I need a woman/I hate men/I hate women/ I grew up angry/I have too much time on my hands so why don’t I iron your clothes and mow the lawn.

21) No, I’m not a specialty fetish prostitute. But, I read the Stripper Rant in the Best Of section, so if you actually show me the $10,000 and you’re not hideous I promise I will actually consider it… for a non-refundable deposit.


Watertown trainer, blogger does reps at the gym and keyboard

Photo by Kate Flock


Personal trainer Danielle Bultron of Boylston Street, sporting a “Danielle’s Diehards” T-shirt, blogs about health, exercise and, of course, her daughter Shanise, who is an athlete in her own right.">phoWPfitness_0118

http://www.wickedlocal.com/watertown/sports/x469077065


WATERTOWN - For the past five years, Danielle Bultron has used her body as the ultimate experiment.

It all began with a couple of barbells, one medicine ball and a $90 stationary bike from Sears.

Since then, the Watertown resident and personal trainer has a completely new outlook on life, love and health — not to mention a completely new body.

You can’t help but notice Bultron, 37, has a certain glow about her. It may be the fact that she is getting married in spring, or that she has a 14-year-old daughter named Shanise, a star basketball and volleyball player at Watertown High School. But it’s

Danielle’s New Year checklist

Buy a scale, heart-rate monitor, calorie counter (“bodybugg”) and measuring tape to track your progress. Weigh yourself and take your body circumference measurements now.

Buy a calorie count book, a food/fitness journal and an eraser/bulletin board.

Join a gym, buy home fitness equipment, hire a trainer and find a workout buddy.

Plan your meals, do a pantry sweep (get rid of all unauthorized foods), go to grocery and stock up on healthy food.

Load your personal cassette, CD or iPod with motivating workout music.

Create your 2008 vision board: poster board, magazines, glue stick.

Join an online community, challenge or contest.

Create your 2008 goals, short term and long term.

Accountability — tell everyone you know about your new weight loss goals and focus. Enjoy today and celebrate the New Year.

*From Danielle Bultron’s personal fitness journal at www.daniellebultron.blogspot.com.

also her passion for fitness and nutrition that keeps her content.

Now she wants to share that joy with others, and help them get on the right track for the New Year and for the rest of their lives.

She said the journey isn’t as easy as a car wash.

“If all we had to do to take care of our body was to nourish and clean it, we’d all be doing it,” she said. “But it’s about the right foods, and it’s about exercise.”

The Boylston Street resident said she hopes to one day open up her own fitness center in Watertown to work more intimately with clients who want to reshape their lives.

For her, it all began five years ago, when she weighed more than 200 pounds and worked at an office job that left her stationary and restless.

Fear of a family history with diabetes kept her motivated, and one particular book helped changed her life, “Body for Life” by Bill Phillips.

Now Bultron is a certified personal trainer who instructs six classes at the Boston Sports Club in the Arsenal. She wants to look perfect in her wedding dress for a Cancun ceremony in May. And she has competed in bodybuilding shows with as little as 10 percent body fat.

“I wanted to see how far I could take my transformation,” she said.

An online daily nutrition and fitness journal helps keep her on track and updates her training clients — know as “Danielle’s Diehards.”

“I want to help everyone and anyone that wants it,” she said.

But Bultron knows that for many who look to get fit, mistakes may be made along the way. The number-one misconception for most, she said, is that people don’t know how many calories they consume, and should maintain a journal to log them every day.

“If you want that bagel with cream cheese at Dunkin’ Donuts, that’s 500 calories you are eating,” she said. “You can find me at the Star Market reading labels every given day of the year.”

Get started now

To contact Danielle Bultron, or to hire her as a personal trainer, e-mail bultron711@rcn.com.

As for exercise, there is a certain meaning behind every move. She incorporates “functional training” for her clients, helping them to concentrate on their “core,” and incorporates both strength and cardio drills for the best results.

“We are supposed to be challenging ourselves,” Bultron said, noting that she even works out on vacation, and trains extra hard before imbibing a bit at a Patriots game.

She said people can stick to their New Year’s resolutions if they create that it can be done. She hopes to be an example of that.

“I want to find a way to educate and find the simplest ways to help,” Bultron said. “It’s all about dedication.”

Danielle’s Top 10 safe weight loss tips

1. Stop making excuses.

2. Make your body a priority.

3. Do 30 to 60 minutes of cardio, 4 to 6 times per week.

Do a total body strength workout, 2 to 3 t

imes per week.

Journal food/calories daily.
Drink 1 gallon of water daily.
Consume 30 grams of fiber each day.
Minimize your sodium and sugar intake.
Log your exercise daily to track your progress.

Jump on the scale once a week and take measurements (waist, hips, etc.)

ESPN.com - E-Ticket: The Ringmaster Rolls On

Fictional ESPN story with a hot chick

Victor Conte

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Gladiator Contendor Belinda Gavin is an actress too

Check out the IMDB link to see that she's done a few....hmm. questionable movies. If you think by questionable I mean almost porn you'd be right. Belinda Gavin (I)

Monday, January 14, 2008

Strong Track Girl.

Don't understand a word of it but she's cute.

Aftonbladet: Starkare än någonsin

NBC’s American Gladiators: No ’Roids, Just Ratings - 1/14/2008 2:01:00 AM - Broadcasting & Cable

This is an interesting story. They have testing at the Gladiators.

NBC’s American Gladiators: No ’Roids, Just Ratings - 1/14/2008 2:01:00 AM - Broadcasting & Cable

When will they test in pro-bodybuilding is the next question.

Sunday, January 13, 2008

Pauliina Talus

Herbicepscam

I've never her of the woman linked below but I want to hear more.

Herbicepscam

Lansing State Journal: Super seniors among us

Lansing State Journal: Super seniors among us

Super seniors among us

For some, living longer just means more years for great adventures

The eldest among us are more than senior citizens, more than an age, a disability, a slower pace or a history lesson.

They give in ways some never recognize - endless, selfless hours volunteering.

They continue to achieve, never settling for just one milestone.

They show the promise and potential of longevity.

The New Age: Living longer in mid-Michigan ends its yearlong focus on aging issues by highlighting seniors who demonstrate promise and potential through their everyday lives.

Georgia Johnson: A passion for health

Doctor becomes weightlifting champ

In her 60s, Georgia Johnson found a new passion.

And it all started with a 100-yard-dash.

On a whim, she signed up for a race. To her surprise, she won.

That led the retired physician and Michigan State University professor from Lansing in a whole new direction. She tried her hand at the discus. She threw the shot put. She gave other distances, such as 200 and 400 meters, a try.

She wound up becoming a dedicated weightlifter and bodybuilder.

"I had been active to the extent of mowing my lawn and doing my yard work, but I had no desire to be an athlete," said Johnson, 77.

She enjoys the sense of being strong, and also takes a practical physician's view: A well-conditioned body is less prone to osteoporosis or fractures.

"It's also to get me out of the house and away from the food," she said.

"And the Y is a friendly place."

Bodybuilding, weightlifting and track competitions have taken Johnson all over the world.

She was a bronze medalist at the World Games in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. She placed fourth through eighth in various events at USA Track and Field World Games in England and Australia in 1999 and 2001.

She placed in the national Senior Olympics and is the current national bench press champion in her category with USA Powerlifting competition

But weightlifting and bodybuilding don't monopolize Johnson's time. She's a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sororities' Delta Tau Omega chapter and sings with the Young at Heart Singers. She founded her own publishing company and has written four books. She was inducted into the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame in 2005.

She enjoys spending time with her three daughters - two physicians and a lawyer - and two grandchildren.

She said she thinks the strength training helps her to enjoy all of those things: "I would like to see women do more strengthening exercises," she said. "I just want to be able to do whatever I want to do."

Ohio.com - American Gladiator is warrior for fitness

Ohio.com - American Gladiator is warrior for fitness American Gladiator is warrior for fitness

Cleveland's Valerie Waugaman plays Siren on NBC series

By Rich Heldenfels
Beacon Journal popular culture writer

When you look at Siren on American Gladiators, besides the costume and the intimidating look, you're sure to notice the sculpted muscles.

Valerie Waugaman sees fat.

''The camera really does add 10 pounds,'' says Waugaman, the 29-year-old Cleveland resident who plays Siren on the NBC series. But she is not some timid little birdie who thinks of anorexia as a means to a better career. In fact, she is very fitness-conscious.

Her personal eating habits include lots of vegetable and protein supplements. So much so that when confronted with the catering table while American Gladiators was taping in November and December, she knew she was going to put on weight.

In her professional life, the graduate of Brecksville High School and Ohio University admits that even the slight bulking up that occurred with Gladiators can be a problem. ''I have sort of a skewed perspective,'' she said in a recent telephone interview.

After all, Waugaman is also a professional bodybuilder with IFBB, or International Federation of Body Building and Fitness. Competing in the figure category, she has won several events and is in training for Columbus' Arnold Sports Festival (yes, that refers to Arnold Schwarzenegger).


Waugaman came to bodybuilding as a way to promote Octane Cafe, a health-conscious restaurant on Cleveland's Euclid Avenue, where she is co-owner and marketing director. Her fiance, Sam Eells, founded the restaurant and hopes to turn it into a national franchise.

So Waugaman constantly preaches the gospel of physical fitness and healthy habits. In addition to boosting the restaurant, she hopes her appearances on American Gladiators will be a springboard to a larger role promoting her ideas, especially to young people.

As a young person, Waugaman was athletic, she said, and ''I was lucky to have good genetics. . . . I was healthier than most, but I ate a lot of frozen dinners, cheese and bologna and things that were really not healthy.''

These days, she said, ''I wouldn't say I'm a vegetarian, but most of my diet consists of vegetables. . . . Lots of spinach. . . . And lots of fish, tofu, natural protein power in shakes.''

That, and a lot of training, not only helped her in bodybuilding but in feeling good overall. ''My skin is better,'' she said. ''My hair is better.'' And when American Gladiators was starting, she was already known well enough in the bodybuilding world that — thanks to a referral from Flex magazine — the show came to her.

Not that it's all been easy. Even in training camp, she said, there was a lot of competition. ''You want to stand out,'' she said. ''That's the nature of who we are. We want to give 100 percent effort. But at the end, we're shaking hands.''

And people really do get hurt on the show. One of the nonprofessional contenders was eliminated by an injury on the first telecast. Waugaman has been sandwiching interviews in between visits to the Cleveland Clinic for physical therapy. While she is glad to have a chance to compete in athletic events beyond the posing of bodybuilding, she said it has been ''emotionally and physically exhausting.''

''You're putting your body through a lot of stuff,'' she said. Even contestants who look easy to beat can surprise. ''No matter what their size is, they can have power and they can have heart.''

There were other issues to consider, too, such as her on-show name. She did not get to pick it but said ''the names are a reflection of who we are.'' She did have some input about her costume, and made sure that it was something she could work in comfortably.

And the show — its regular time slot is 8 p.m. Monday — seems to be working. To be sure, the competition is less intense because the writers strike has taken a lot of hit shows off the air. But NBC has been pleased with the early numbers, and it will replay an episode at 10 tonight to make up for the strike-caused loss of a full Golden Globe Awards telecast.

So it appears likely that Waugaman will be putting on the Siren suit again. And that may take her out of bodybuilding. She admitted that it's not good to go back and forth between her figure-competition regimen and American Gladiators, so ''I'm going to have to make some choices.''


Rich Heldenfels writes about popular culture for the Beacon Journal and in a blog at http://www.ohio.com. Contact him at 330-996-3582 or rheldenfels@thebeaconjournal.com.

When you look at Siren on American Gladiators, besides the costume and the intimidating look, you're sure to notice the sculpted muscles.

Valerie Waugaman sees fat.

''The camera really does add 10 pounds,'' says Waugaman, the 29-year-old Cleveland resident who plays Siren on the NBC series. But she is not some timid little birdie who thinks of anorexia as a means to a better career. In fact, she is very fitness-conscious.

Her personal eating habits include lots of vegetable and protein supplements. So much so that when confronted with the catering table while American Gladiators was taping in November and December, she knew she was going to put on weight.

In her professional life, the graduate of Brecksville High School and Ohio University admits that even the slight bulking up that occurred with Gladiators can be a problem. ''I have sort of a skewed perspective,'' she said in a recent telephone interview.

After all, Waugaman is also a professional bodybuilder with IFBB, or International Federation of Body Building and Fitness. Competing in the figure category, she has won several events and is in training for Columbus' Arnold Sports Festival (yes, that refers to Arnold Schwarzenegger).


Waugaman came to bodybuilding as a way to promote Octane Cafe, a health-conscious restaurant on Cleveland's Euclid Avenue, where she is co-owner and marketing director. Her fiance, Sam Eells, founded the restaurant and hopes to turn it into a national franchise.

So Waugaman constantly preaches the gospel of physical fitness and healthy habits. In addition to boosting the restaurant, she hopes her appearances on American Gladiators will be a springboard to a larger role promoting her ideas, especially to young people.

As a young person, Waugaman was athletic, she said, and ''I was lucky to have good genetics. . . . I was healthier than most, but I ate a lot of frozen dinners, cheese and bologna and things that were really not healthy.''

These days, she said, ''I wouldn't say I'm a vegetarian, but most of my diet consists of vegetables. . . . Lots of spinach. . . . And lots of fish, tofu, natural protein power in shakes.''

That, and a lot of training, not only helped her in bodybuilding but in feeling good overall. ''My skin is better,'' she said. ''My hair is better.'' And when American Gladiators was starting, she was already known well enough in the bodybuilding world that — thanks to a referral from Flex magazine — the show came to her.

Not that it's all been easy. Even in training camp, she said, there was a lot of competition. ''You want to stand out,'' she said. ''That's the nature of who we are. We want to give 100 percent effort. But at the end, we're shaking hands.''

And people really do get hurt on the show. One of the nonprofessional contenders was eliminated by an injury on the first telecast. Waugaman has been sandwiching interviews in between visits to the Cleveland Clinic for physical therapy. While she is glad to have a chance to compete in athletic events beyond the posing of bodybuilding, she said it has been ''emotionally and physically exhausting.''

''You're putting your body through a lot of stuff,'' she said. Even contestants who look easy to beat can surprise. ''No matter what their size is, they can have power and they can have heart.''

There were other issues to consider, too, such as her on-show name. She did not get to pick it but said ''the names are a reflection of who we are.'' She did have some input about her costume, and made sure that it was something she could work in comfortably.

And the show — its regular time slot is 8 p.m. Monday — seems to be working. To be sure, the competition is less intense because the writers strike has taken a lot of hit shows off the air. But NBC has been pleased with the early numbers, and it will replay an episode at 10 tonight to make up for the strike-caused loss of a full Golden Globe Awards telecast.

So it appears likely that Waugaman will be putting on the Siren suit again. And that may take her out of bodybuilding. She admitted that it's not good to go back and forth between her figure-competition regimen and American Gladiators, so ''I'm going to have to make some choices.''

MailTribune.com: Dream comes true for Medford gladiator

MailTribune.com: Dream comes true for Medford gladiator

A teenage dream of competing on "American Gladiators" was fulfilled for one Medford native last week on national television.

The revamped television show has given Siene Silva a shot at $100,000, a Toyota Sequoia and a chance to be called the "American Gladiator."

Silva, 34, who now coaches gymnastics in Washington, D.C., dominated the first round of the new season, which premiered Jan. 7.

Using her gymnastics and bodybuilding history, she steamrolled over her competition and the show's gladiators in grueling physical challenges such as Gauntlet, Joust, Assault and Hang Tough. She said she came out of the battles with only a few bruises, including one inflicted when the padding fell off a competitor's stick in the Joust.

In the show, competitors try to complete a series of physical tests while defending themselves from the show's professional "gladiators."

Sometimes the challenges came from unexpected sources. Heading into the final event of the show with a lead over her opponents, Silva lost her contact lenses when she leaped into the water for the 25-meter swim.

"I had to finish the rest of the event practically blind," she said. "It was so exhausting. It really is as hard as it looks on the TV. It is a tough mental and physical challenge that is exciting but extremely tiring."

Silva's winning time of 2 minutes and 22 seconds in the final event gave her one of the final eight spots, with the next episode scheduled to air sometime in February. The show runs at 8 p.m. Mondays on NBC Channel 5. Past episodes can be seen on www.nbc.com/americangladiators.

Beating out a field of 12,000 contestant hopefuls, she was chosen after applying for the show a few months earlier in Texas.

"It was a lengthy audition process," she said. "There were a ton of great athletes who tried out. I'm glad they gave me a shot because I've been dreaming of competing on the show since it first aired in the early '90s."

Growing up in Medford with five siblings, she kept active in various athletics, including gymnastics, power lifting and arm wrestling. She cited her gymnastics and power lifting coaches, Debi Glass and Sam Pecktol, as inspirations who helped her achieve her goals.

"I'm really blessed to have had great coaches over the years. They have influenced and shown me the tools for success," she said. "I am grateful for all they have done."

Silva's mother, Lynn Campbell, who lives in Medford with her husband, Herb, said the entire family was thrilled to see her on the show.

"It's been a real exciting time for the whole family. I'm so proud of what my daughter has accomplished," she said.

After completing an exercise sports science degree at Portland State University, Silva worked in various positions involving senior citizens or sports.

She has run in more than 17 marathons and triathlons, including five with her mother.

After competing in fitness competitions over the past few years, she won her professional status in the International Federation of Body Building last November.

"Staying fit and believing in myself has made this experience amazing," she said. "It also reconnected me with old friends from home. I'm thankful for all the people who have supported and motivated me to great heights."

Friday, January 11, 2008

The Big Lead » Blog Archive » Hell Hath No Fury Like Serena Williams Scorned

The Big Lead » Blog Archive » Hell Hath No Fury Like Serena Williams Scorned

Diet, hard work are Elk Grove natural bodybuilding champion Michelle Shepherd’s key to success

SN&R > Guides > Health & Fitness > Natural woman > 01.10.08

Natural woman

Diet, hard work are Elk Grove natural bodybuilding champion Michelle Shepherd’s key to success


By Seth Sandronksy


Michelle Shepherd bakes gourmet cheesecakes as a hobby. But when the winner of the World Natural Bodybuilding Federation’s Ms. Exercise World Figure Championships prepares for bodybuilding and figure contests, dessert is off the menu. In fact, Shepherd says watching her food intake is the biggest challenge of her regimen.

“The cardio and weight training are tough, but diet affects every aspect of my life,” said Shepherd, 38, an Elk Grove resident. “That means lots of cooking, eating and dish-washing,” she laughed. “I take my food with me when leaving the house, which cuts out going to social functions. It’s really hard but very rewarding.”

To reach her contest bodyweight of 105-106 lbs., or 6 percent body fat, Shepherd eats meals of lean proteins, healthy carbohydrates and fats six times a day. She diets and trains “naturally,” not using outlawed substances. Some other competitors use such shortcuts to increase muscle and lose fat faster.

Off-season, she gains about 8 pounds by, in part, indulging herself in the occasional slice of her cheesecake or crunchy apple pie. She bakes the latter with a recipe that uses a sugar substitute and oat flour instead of white flour.

“You would never know it by its taste,” Shepherd said. “I also make protein pumpkin bread and protein banana bread using all healthy ingredients, like oat flour, flax meal, oat bran, protein powder, cinnamon and egg whites. Everyone who tastes it loves it. They can’t believe that it is actually good for you.”

Currently, she weight trains five days a week, working two body parts a day. Shepherd does three to four sets per body part, six to 15 repetitions per set. And unlike some other bodybuilders, she does not watch the clock at the gym. “The longer that I rest between sets, the more weight I can lift. I go faster when training with Mark, my husband, because he wants to get through it!”

She does more cardio work when not training for a contest, typically 20 to 30 minutes, four to five days a week, sometimes twice daily. “First thing in the morning is always the most productive time to lose body fat. I will eat only a rice cake, so as not to burn muscle, then go for a jog. Immediately afterward, I will eat breakfast.” For cardio training, she also does machine work at the gym and runs up and down stairs at home.

A graduate of Valley High School, Shepherd trains at California Family Fitness in Elk Grove. A gymnast from childhood through high school, she was also a cheerleader at Valley. Shepherd played co-ed softball as a 20-something. “I started going to the gym six years ago because having gotten into my 30s and seeing that my clothes were getting a little tight, I figured that I better start working out.”


Shepherd began to work out each day after she left her job as a custom picture framer. In time she met Mark, and they became workout partners before getting married in August 2002. A half-year of inconsistent visits to the gym ensued, leaving them out of shape. This period of relative inactivity, in turn, spurred the Shepherds to return to the gym regularly. Their fitness regimen, however, lacked direction. An acquaintance recommended they see Fred Larson, a personal trainer and World Natural Bodybuilding Federation pro bodybuilder.

Unlike the International Federation of Bodybuilders, which does not screen for steroids, growth hormone and other controversial supplements, the WNBF adheres to rigid rules prohibiting the use of such substances. As the negative side effects of steroid use have become more well known in recent years, natural bodybuilding has increased in popularity, especially among competitors.

Meeting Larson in 2004 proved pivotal for the Shepherds. He provided advice on proper diet and exercise that “totally changed” her life, Shepherd explained. Larson gives most of the credit to the Shepherds.

“I helped them with their focus,” he said. He recommended clean nutrition (emphasizing unprocessed foods), heavy free weights (dumbbells and barbells), moderate cardio exercise and proper recovery time between workouts. “The Shepherds did the rest of it themselves.”

Under Larson’s tutelage, they achieved attention-grabbing results. “After six to eight months on Larson’s new routine, people began to ask me if I was going to compete,” Shepherd said. Later, both Shepherds decided to enter the Capital City Bodybuilding Championships in July 2005. They won first place in their respective divisions.

The Shepherds attended the same contest in 2006 as spectators, a decision that Shepherd later regretted. “Once we were there I wished I would have competed,” she said. “It was then that I decided I was going to compete in 2007.”

And compete she did, entering six contests last year. In the beginning, she concentrated only on winning bodybuilding contests. Then her competitive path took a slight twist. “My girlfriend convinced me to compete in figure as well as bodybuilding contests,” she said. “I had not considered figure until then.”

In figure contests, judges rank competitors on their aesthetics, muscle tone and symmetry. Muscle size is not emphasized as much as it is in bodybuilding. After working with Dr. Joe Klemczewski, of nutrition and training tip Web site “The Diet Doc,” on her nutrition, she entered her first figure competition in Boston last May. She won the title of overall figure champion, which came as “a shock” to her.

The Boston victory paved the way for Shepherd to compete professionally and win cash prizes. In late June, she won a bodybuilding contest in New York in which she earned professional status as well. She returned to Elk Grove to nab first place in a bodybuilding and figure contest last July.

Against the backdrop of widespread use of drugs in pro baseball and football and amateur track and field, Shepherd is a natural athlete. She says that meeting her fellow competitors is perhaps the greatest joy that bodybuilding and figure contests offer. “The camaraderie between the ladies is really awesome, for me to speak with others who have gone through similar training.”

The exact date of her next contest is uncertain. It seems the Shepherds are planning to start a family. “We have thrown around the idea of my competing this September or November if I am not yet pregnant,” she said. “I could also compete after having children.”

Her competitors would be wise to never underestimate this natural woman.


Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Cory at 50

Finally a issue of a muscle mag that doesn't feature a dude in a speedo. Ironman needs to go into the vault to find a well known female bodybuilder that may sell an issue or two. I have a list of women I'd like to see but Cory still looks great. I've seen 10 year old buildings made of concrete look like shit so looking like she does at 50 is no small feat.


Iron Man Magazine | In This Issuecurrent iron man issue

Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Great Advertising.

lifeiscarbon®: Sexy LegsPhotoPhoto

TV Review: American Gladiators

TV Review: American Gladiators: "American Gladiators
Starring:: Hulk Hogan (host), Laila Ali (host), Gladiators: Crush, Fury, Hellga,TV Review: American Gladiators Justice, Mayhem, Militia, Siren, Stealth, Titan, Toa, Venom, Wolf
Airs: Sundays at 9:00 p.m. on NBC

It’s a good thing that NBC decided to lead into the premiere of American Gladiators with an 80s edition of Deal or No Deal. Seeing the models in their “Material Girl” Madonna outfits got me in the right mood for the return of one of my favorite shows from my teenage years. But will the new versions of Nitro, Ice and Zap be able to hold a laser cannon to the old version?

There is one thing I miss so far that was key to the old show. In the 90s version, they actually made it seem like the show was a legitimate sporting event. They had play-by-play guys calling the action like it was Monday Night Football. They even had former NFL pro Larry Csonka as one of the commentators analyzing the contestants while they moved about the playing field. The new team of Hulk Hogan and Laila Ali, on the NBC version, are more like sideline reporters, which are normally the worst part of any sports broadcast. Laila Ali has proved to be a walking box of clichés, and maybe she should been better off being a Gladiator than asking them questions. And Hulk Hogan will never be confused with Pet"http://www.cinemablend.com/television/TV-Review-American-Gladiators-8131.html